Friday, November 4, 2016

This Day, November 5, In Jewish History by Mitchell A. Levin


November 5

1271: Birthdate of Mahmud Ghazan, the Mongol ruler whose conversion to Islam in 1295 led to the “Persian Jews in Tabriz” being relegated “once again to the status of dhimmis” which was followed by his successors destruction of several synagogues and enforcement of laws requiring to wear “a distinctive mark on their head.

1370: King Casimir III of Poland passed away.  Born in 1310, he came to the throne in 1333.  From the Jewish point of Casimir III was seen as a cut above the average ruler. He was favorably disposed toward Jews. On October 9, 1344 he confirmed the privileges granted to Jewish Poles in 1264 by Boleslaus V. Under penalty of death he prohibited the kidnapping of Jewish children for the purpose of forcible Christian baptism. He inflicted heavy punishment for the desecration of Jewish cemeteries. Although Jews were living in Poland earlier, Casimir allowed them to settle in Poland in great numbers and protected them as king's people.

1597: Sir Henry Finch, the author of a book calling for “the restoration of the Jews to the promised land” addressed Parliament on the need to create a committee to examine “the extreme and miserable estate of the godly honest sort of the poor subjects of this realm.”

1605: The Gunpowder Plot, an attempt to blow up the House of Lords which would be the first move in putting a Catholic on throne, was thwarted today.  This event which is tied in the popular mind to Guy Fawkes could have had a negative impact on the small, concealed Jewish population of the British Isles since a Catholic on the throne at this time might have tied the kingdom to Spain the home of the Inquisition.

1615: Birthdate of Ibrahim I, another of the Sultans who reigned during the seventeenth century, a period of decline for the Ottoman Empire.  He did employ at least one Jew in close capacity, Doctor Moshe Raphael Abravanel who changed his name to Hayati Zade.

1655: In New Amsterdam, the government refused to allow Jews to stand guard, requiring them to pay a tax instead. In effect, this made Jews “second class citizens.”  Jacob Barsimon and Asser Levy refused to pay the tax petitioned to stand guard.  At first they were met with resistance, but Asser Levy performed the guard duties anyway just like any other burgher of the town. He would later be granted full citizenship rights in New Amsterdam, the first for a Jew in North America.

November 5(8th of Cheshvan, 5446):1685: In Surinam, Congregation Bracha V'Shalom, one of the oldest congregations in the Americas was dedicated at Jodensvanne or “Jewish Savanna.” Built “on a hill in accordance with Talmudic interpretation” and one the bank of the Suriname River which provided “naturally flowing water purification rituals,” the 90 by 40 by 33 structure was used as a Beit Knesset, Beit Din and Beit Midrash for over 180 years at which time it was abandoned due to the shrinking Jewish population which had been declining since the first decades of the 18th century following an invasion by a French fleet.

1688: William of Orange lands at Brixham marking the start of the Glorious Revolution which was financed, in part, “by the Jewish banker Francisco Lopes Suasso who lent two million guilder and when asked what security he desired, Suasso answered: ‘If you are victorious, you will surely repay me; if not, the loss is mine.’” As King William III he would be the English monarch who knighted a Jew - Solomon de Medina,

1735: In Mantua, a town in the Italian province of Lombardy, a pact between the Jewish community and the local high school was mediated by the Secretary of State. In return for the Jewish community providing liquor, and other gifts to the school on St. Catherine's day, the students would not press their right to throw objects at any Jew who passes the school.

1785: the council of Pennsylvania, under the presidency of Benjamin Franklin, ordered that a pension be paid to Colonel Solomon Bush, the brother of fellow solider Jonas Bush, for his meritorious services during the American Revolution.

1785: Birthdate of Dutch teacher and author Moses Leman whose works included Spirit of Talmudic Lord and Test of Talmudic Mathematics.

1779(26th of Cheshvan, 5540): Isaac Simon Cohen Kats-Shamash who had been born at Amsterdam in 1701 passed away today in his native city.

1816: Birthdate of historian Siegfried Hirsch who “published an award winning essay on King Henry I” but who died before he could finish “his treatise on Holy Roman Emperor Henry II and whose cousin, the historian Theodor Hirsch had converted to Christianity.

1824: In Frankfurt am Main Malchen and David Philipp Schloss gave birth to Daniel Hirsch Schloss.

1824: In Frankfurt am Main Malchen and David Philipp Schloss gave birth to Leopold Schloss the husband of Annie Montefiore, the daughter of Horatio J. Montefiore, who was a “member of the Council and Past Warden of the West London Synagogue as well as Vice President of the Anglo-Jewish Association.

1826(5th of Cheshvan, 5587): Élie Halévy, a French Hebrew poet and author who was the father of Fromental and Léon Halévy passed away. Born in 1760 at Fürth in Bavaria, Halévy moved to Paris, where he became cantor and secretary to the Jewish Consistoire of Paris. His knowledge of the Talmud and his poetical talent earned him the esteem of many French scholars, particularly the well-known Orientalist Sylvestre de Sacy. His first poem was "Ha-Shalom", a hymn composed on the occasion of the treaty of Amiens; it was sung in the synagogue of Paris, in both Hebrew and French, on the 17th Brumaire (8 November) 1801. The poem was praised in Latin verses by Protestant pastor Marron. In 1808 Halévy composed a prayer to be recited on the anniversary of the battle of Wagram; in 1817, with the help of some of his co-religionists, he founded the French weekly "L'Israélite Français", which, however, expired within two years. To this periodical he contributed a remarkable dialogue entitled "Socrate et Spinosa" (ii. 73). His "Limmude Dat u-Musar" (Metz, 1820) is a text-book of religious instruction compiled from the Bible, with notes, a French translation, and the decisions of the Sanhedrin instituted by Napoleon. Halévy left two unpublished works, a Hebrew-French dictionary and an essay on Æsop's fables. He attributes the fables to Solomon (comp. I Kings v. 12-13 [A. V. iv. 32-33]), and thinks the name "Æsop" to be a form of "Asaph".

1828(28th of Cheshvan, 5589): Berr Isaac Beer a French manufacture passed away. Born at Nancy in 1744, he came from “a rich and estimable family; received an excellent education, especially in Hebrew and rabbinical literature—in the latter from Jacob Perle, chief rabbi of Nancy. Inheriting the title of syndic of the Jewish community of Nancy, bestowed upon his father in 1753 by King Stanislaus, he took an active part in the direction of the affairs of the community. In 1789 he was elected by the Jews of Alsace deputy to the States-General, where he was admitted to plead for Jewish emancipation before the Assembly. At about that time he published a pamphlet in which he refuted the anti-Jewish discourse delivered by De la Farre, bishop of Nancy. Berr was appointed successively member of the Assembly of Notables and member of the Sanhedrin; and he cooperated effectively in the organization of Jewish worship in France and in Italy. In his old age he retired, pensioned by the king, to one of his estates called "Turique"—the name of which he added to his own with the royal permission.”

1834: At Angenrod in the grand duchy of Hesse- Darmstadt, Mayer Bamberger and his wife gave birth to Isaac Bamberger, the German Rabbi who made a great effort to aid the Russian Jews who took refuge in Germany after 1882 when the Czar’s anti-Jewish laws began to have their most pernicious effect.

1835: Birthdate of Moritz Szeps, the Galician born journalist who was editor-in-chief of the Vienna Morgenpost and a friend of Crown Prince Rudolf

1845: In Szeged, Bernát (Bernhard) Schwimmer and his first wife gave birth to Max (Miksa or Maximilian) Bernát Schwimmer who along with his grandfather, father and brothers bought and sold horses in Turkey and the Balkans while also earing income from their farm, orchards, flour mills and distillery.

1849(20th of Cheshvan): Rabbi Elijah ben Jacob Raoler of Kalisz, author of Yad Eliyahu passed away today

1852: The New York Times correspondent sent a report to from Constantinople ten years ago Smyrna had had a population of 130,000 which included 13,000 Jews.  Today the population has grown to 160,000 with percentage of Jews remaining about the same.

1852: The New York Times reported that “the Senate of Frankfort, supported by a resolution of the German Diet, has cancelled the article of the law of 1849 securing equality of political rights to citizens of all persuasions, thus excluding Jews from all share in the elections.  New elections will take place immediately,” at which time only Christians will be allowed to vote.

1853: In a column entitled "Australia" published today reported on the wonders of the land down under including a description of Melbourne, a town with streets that were broader than those of New York and filled with a strange medley of people that including Jews, among others.

1853: In London, Marcus Samuel, a member of an Iraqi Jewish family who “ran a successful import-export business” and his wife gave birth to Sir Marcus Samuel, 1st Viscount Bearsted, “the founder of the Shell Transport and Trading Company, which later became a part of Royal Dutch Shell” and holder of several public offices including Alderman of the City of London, Sherriff and Lord Mayor.

1855: Birthdate of Eugene V. Debs, labor activist, reformer and Socialist Candidate for President of the United States.  From the Civil War until the Great Depression a majority of Jews tended to vote for Republican Presidential candidates.  Debs helped to break that trend.  His Socialist views found support among the immigrants from Eastern Europe, many of whom were working in the garment industry.  When Debs ran for President against the Republican Harding and Democrat Davis he gained 38% of the Jewish vote.  This almost matched Harding’s 43% and far exceeded Davis’ 19%.  The real shift in Jewish voting patterns would be seen in the election of 1928 when Al Smith was the Democratic standard bearer.

1860(20th of Cheshvan, 5621): Birthdate of Sholom Dovber Schneersohn, the fifth Lubavitcher Rebbe. There is no way this blog can do justice to this Rebbe who provided leadership through the difficult days of the May Laws and World War I.

1862: Simon J. Arnold of Company K of the 151st Regiment which served as bodyguard for President Lincoln who would reach the rank of Sergeant and would be wounded at Gettysburg, enlisted today.

1863: In New York, the Hebrew Benevolent and Orphan Asylum under the leadership of President Benjamin I. Hart and Superintendent Herman Baar “dedicated its orphan asylum on East 77th Street.

1871: It was reported today that the Jewish Messenger has expressed its opposition to the attempt by some Jews to stop observing the Hebrew Sabbath and shift to observing the Christian Sunday. The Messenger takes issue with those who claim that change is allowed since the observance of the Sabbath was intended for a specific place (ancient Israel) and/or that it was to political measure intended to curry favor with the laborers of ancient time. The Messenger claims that there is no basis in fact for these claims.  It quotes the commandment to prove its point that the Jewish Sabbath is a blessing to be observed on the seventh day. ”The children of Israel shall observe the Sabbath, to keep it throughout their generations for a permanent covenant; it is a sign between me and the children of Israel forever.”

1873: An article published today described the origins and current status of the various religious groups found in New York City. The unnamed author reported that the while the exact date of the arrival of the first Jews is not known, the date usually used is 1660 which is four years before the English took control of the city from the Dutch. Regardless of the exact date, the Jews were here before the Roman Catholics or the Episcopalians.  The early Jews had to deal with various forms of “persecution” but are now successful members of the community who build not only beautiful houses of worship but have established numerous institutions for the care of the sick, the aged and the helpless. There are approximately 40,000 Jews living in New York, most of whom who have come in the last 25 years. The city has 26 synagogues valued at $2,500,000. The average salary for a Rabbi is $2,200.  The lowest paid makes $500 and the highest paid makes $6,000. For a point reference Unitarians earn an average of $5,000 and Lutherans earn an average of $1,800.

1875: Based on information that had appeared in the Times of London, it was reported today that Czar has given a young Jew named Frehmann a commission in the Russian Army.  If so, this would make him the first Jew to ever serve as an officer in the forces of the Czar. [This would seem to contradict claims that Joseph Trumpeldor was the first Jewish officer in the Russian Army.]

1877: It was reported today that supporters of Thomas C.E. Ecclesine, a candidate for the New York State Senate have taken advantage of his German sounding name to pass him off as being Jewish in those part of the district that have a large Jewish vote. However, they have also claimed that he is an Irish Catholic in an attempt to garner that segment of the vote. (Since he was married at St. Ann’s Church by Father William Jackson, it is fair to say that his attempt to gain the Jewish vote was not based on fact. The ruse attests to the growing importance of the Jewish Vote.)

1880: Seventy-three year old Louis Félicien Joseph Caignart de Saulcy the French nobleman and amateur archeologist who first visited Palestine in 1850, toured the Dead Sea, made the first map of Masada and “identified Tell es-Sultain as the site of ancient Jericho passed away today.

1881: It was reported today that the Deutsch Tagblatt, an anti-Semitic newspaper has announced that the Conservative Committee has sent a telegram to Bismarck declaring their continued opposition to the Progressives in the Reichstag.

1881: Based on information that first appeared in the National Zeitung, it was reported today that Chancellor Bismarck has declared that he “would never entertain a proposal to curtail the rights of Jews.”

1881: In response to a request by a an interdenominational committee, rabbis throughout the United States are expected to address their congregations during Shabbat services about the creation of James Garfield Hospital in Washington, DC and solicit their financial support for the creation of this memorial to the late U.S. President.  Christian ministers will address their congregations on the subject tomorrow.

1882: “Not Prejudiced Against Jews” published today contains a list of prominent citizens including Dr. Abraham Jacobi, Felix Adler and the Seligmans attesting to the fact that ex-Governor Edward Salomon “does not entertain any prejudices against the Jewish race.”  (Salomon is not to be confused with Edward Selig Salomon who was a German Jewish immigrant and who also served as a governor)

1883: It was reported today that the preparations for celebrating the centennial of Moses Montefiore which will take place next year have the added proof of putting to rest doubts among some Englishman that any person has attained the age of 100.

1885(27th of Cheshvan, 5646): Jonas Strauss, the head of the dry goods firm of J. Strauss, Brother & Company passed away today in New York.  He was also a partner in Levi Strauss & Co. in San Francisco.  The San Francisco company was started in 1851 by Jonas, Louis and Levi Strauss (the man who gave us Levi jeans).  Twenty-one year old Jonas Strauss stayed in New York and shipped material “around the Horn” to his brothers in California.  His prosperity could be measured by his generous contributions to various Jewish charities and not by his life-style which was so simple that he refused to purchase his own horse and carriage.


1887: It was reported today that the Hebrew Sheltering Guardian Society for Children will be hosting a benefit performance next week.

1887: Birthdate of Paul Wittgenstein “an Austrian-born concert pianist, who became known for his ability to play with just his left hand, after he lost his right arm during the First World War. He devised novel techniques, including pedal and hand-movement combinations that allowed him to play chords previously regarded as impossible for a five-fingered pianist. The Wittgenstein family had converted to Christianity three generations before his birth on the paternal side and two generations before on the maternal side; nonetheless they were of mainly Jewish descent, and under the Nuremberg laws they were classed as Jews. Following the rise of the Nazi Party and the annexation of Austria, Paul tried to persuade his sisters Helene and Hermine to leave Vienna, but they demurred: they were attached to their homes there, and could not believe such a distinguished family as theirs was in real danger. Ludwig had already been living in England for some years, and Margaret (Gretl) was married to an American. Paul himself, who was no longer permitted to perform in public concerts under the Nazis, departed for the United States in 1938. From there he and Gretl…managed to use family finances (mostly held abroad) and legal connections to attain non-Jewish status for their sisters. The family finances supposedly consisted of the voluntary surrender of all properties and assets in Germany and occupied lands with a total value of about US$6 billion at the time, which may have been the largest private fortune in Europe. Essentially all family assets were surrendered to the Nazis in return for protection afforded the two sisters under exceptional interpretations of racial law, allowing them to continue to live in their family palace in Vienna.” He died in New York City in 1961

1888(1st of Kislev, 5649): Rosh Chodesh Kislev

1888(1st of Kislev, 5649): Seventy-nine year old orientalist Louis Lowe who traveled to Palestine where he studied the practices of the Samaritans and the works of the Karaites and who headed two different Jewish schools in England passed away today.

1888: It was reported today that among the books now available in New York are Idylls of Israel and Other Poems by D. J. Donahue and The Wandering Jew, a three volume work by Eugene Sue.

1888: “Government By The People” published today summarized a lecture by Dr. Gustav Gottheil in which he contended that the concept of popular government has its origins in Biblical Judaism.  According to the rabbi, “The whole idea of popular government pervaded the law of god and the sentiments of the Jews.”

1893: “Candidates of the Parties” published today provided profiles of those running on Democratic State ticket in New York including Simon W. Rosendale, native of Albany who is running for Attorney General and who a trustee of Congregation Anshe-Emeth, President of the Jewish Home Society and a leader of B’nai B’rith

1893: Tammany Hall closed the campaign tonight with three mass meetings including one at the Hebrew Institute.

1893: “Work of the Reichstag” published today described activities at the current session of the German parliament including the introduction of bills designed to “counteract the dismemberment of the large estates and to regulate interest on loans and mortgages” which are both said to have an “anti-Semitic flavor” because the landed gentry who borrow from Jewish bankers pay off their debts by selling portions of their landed holdings.

1893: According to the annual report delivered by Morris Goodhart, President of the Hebrew Sheltering Guardian a summary of which was published today, the society is caring for 2,339 children, 974 of whom were born in the United States, 521 of whom were born in Poland, 367 of whom were born in the Austro-Hungarian Empire with balance coming from places as disparate as Britain, Germany, France, Holland, Spain, Sweden and Jerusalem.

1893: Five Polish Jews continued to be held in jail at Hudson, NY as they await Grand Jury action on charges of “illegal registration”

1894: The speeches at the rally for Congressman Timothy J. Campbell were delivered in a variety of foreign languages including Russian and Hebrew which would provide some indication as to the importance of the Jewish immigrant vote in the upcoming election.

1895: A list of the bequests left by the late Julius Lipman published today including $500 to be given to each of the following: Mount Sinai Hospital, the Montefiore Home, the United Hebrew Charities and Congregation B’nai Jeshurun.

1895: At 8 o’clock this evening Isaac Klein and M.D. Rothschild were the only two leaders of Confederated Good Government Clubs to be found at its headquarters on Broadway where reports of a Tammany victory were being received with the expected dismay and disappointment.

1895: In the response of Dr. Maurice H. Harris to Israel Zangwill’s views on Reform Judaism published today the rabbi at Temple Israel said, “It may be easy for critics to formulate a rational Judaism, or a poetic Judaism, a Judaism conservative or a Judaism radical.  It is not a better Judaism that we want but better Jews.”

1896(29th of Cheshvan, 5657): Eighty-year old Rachel, Countess d’Avigdor second daughter of Sir Isaac Lyon and Isabel Goldsmid and wife of Count Salamon Henri d'Avigdor who “was at one time president of the Ladies' Committee of the Jews' Deaf and Dumb Home, and honorary secretary of the West End Charity; also a member of the committees of the Jewish Convalescent Home, of the workhouse committee of the Jewish Board of Guardians, and of the West End Sabbath School” passed away today.

1898: “Books and Authors” published today included a review of several works translated by Dr. Samuel A. Binion the native of Suwalki who was educated in both Hebrew and the Talmud before he moved to England in the 1860’s where he converted to Christianity.  He also exposed a manuscript reputed to have been written by Maimonides which had been purchased by Adolph Sutro, the first Jewish mayor of San Francisco as being a forgery.

1899: The twentieth annual meeting of the Directors of the Hebrew Sheltering Guardian Society was held today. Samuel D. Levy, President of the Board of Trustees, read his annual report, which included the report of the Treasurer for the fiscal year just ended. The income from bequests and membership fees was $102,911.19, and the disbursements $102,725.52.

1899: Rabbi Samuel Schulman delivered a talk today entitled “Zangwill’s Children of the Ghetto, an Incomplete Picture of Jews and Judaism.”

1900: In Red Bank, NJ, “Jennie Elizabeth (née Tim) and Charles Emanual Schafer” gave birth to the eldest of their three children, Natalie Schafer whose most famous role was that of Eunice Howell who, along with her husband Thurston Howell, made up the snobby rich couple on the sit-com “Gilligan’s Island”

1902: Herzl's London representative, Leopold Greenberg, met Lord Cromer, British Counsel-General in Egypt, and Egyptian prime minister Boutros Ghali Pasha. He succeeded in winning them over to the Zionist cause.

1902: “In the small town of Lagow,in the Opatow district of Radom in what is now Poland” Abraham and Sara Gitel Salesburg gave birth to Joseph Baruch (J.B.) Salesberg who at the age of 11 settled in Toronto with his family where he eventually pursued a political career that included serving as being a member of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario.

1902:  Birthdate of Boruch Minewitz the native of the Ukraine who gained fame as harmonica great and actor Borrah Minevitch, leader of The Harmonic Rascals.

1905: As violence continues to rock Russia and Jews throughout the Empire from Moscow, to Odessa to Bessarabia continue to live in fear off further attack by mobs many of whom are egged on the police and the army, twenty people were killed and another eighty were injured in Kremechug.

1905: From Riga, United States Consul Bornholdt telegraphed the U.S. Chargé d'affaires in St. Petersburg saying “that the situation was extremely serious” and “demanding military protection”

1905: An appeal arrived from George R. Martin, the American Consular Agent at Rostoff-on-Don asking for military protection due to the detonating situation.

1905: “A private telegram from St. Petersburg” arrived in Berlin saying there have been massacres of Jews in Odessa, Kiev, Kishinev, Saratoff, Kazan, Minsk, Tomsk, Theodosia, Jaroslav, Mariupol, Elizabethgrad “and many other city” with an “enormous numbers of persons murdered” and “incalculable property loss.”

1905: A tour today of Odessa today showed that “the poorer Jewish quarters suffered the worst” damage while with few exception the Russian shops painted with crosses and ikons “were untouched.”

1905: At an overflow meeting held on the third floor of Clinton Hall, Joseph Barondess paid tribute to the memory of the Secretary of State Hay who had stopped the first outbreak of violence against the Jews of Kiev while the attendees “decided that working people all over the United States should, on a day yet to be selected, cease their work and gather to listen to addresses and pass resolutions of protects in order to call the attention of the civilized world to the wholesale killing of Jews in Russia.”

1905: Tonight, “at the Sixty-seventh Street Synagogue, a large gathering of Jews denounced the massacres in Russia” and made plans “to take definite steps to protest in the name of the Jews of America and civilization against conditions prevailing in Russia and to raise contributions for the widows and orphans of those slain.”

1909: The Turkish Ministry of Interior asked the Council of State to accelerate the passage of immigration laws. On the same day several hundred Jewish recruits presented themselves for enrollment in the Turkish Army.

1910: It was reported today that Alfred M. Heinsheimer has donated one million dollars to the New York Foundation, a non-sectarian organization he founded “to promote charitable, educational and philanthropic enterprises.  The one million dollars had been a bequest from the late Louis A. Heinsheimer, which, according to his will, was supposed to be left to 6 existing Jewish charities if they could come together and form one common federation within two years.  When they failed to do so, under the terms of the will, the money then went to Alfred.  Alfred was so intent on fulfilling his brother’s wish of creating a Jewish Federation, that he said he would waive his claim to the money if five of the charities would come together.  They failed to do so and Alfred acted in a manner consistent with his brother’s generosity.

1911: After declaring war on the Ottoman Empire on September 29, 1911, Italy annexed Tripoli and Cyrenaica marking the end of 350 years of Ottoman rule. There were approximately 20,000 Jews living there at the time.  Over the next twenty years, the Jewish population would increase as Italian Jews made their way to this area which is known as Libya.  While one source describes this “as a golden age for Libya’s Jews” others note the clashes that took place between the native population and their co-religionists who came with the Italian conquerors.
 
1912: Woodrow Wilson was elected President, defeating Progressive Republican Theodore Roosevelt and incumbent Republican William Howard Taft.  Wilson appointed Louis Brandeis to the Supreme Court.  Brandeis was the first Jew appointed to the high court.

1912: Oscar Straus who was running on both the Progressive and Independence League tickets lost his bid to be elected Governor of New York.

1912: Maxim Birnkraut was elected to the New York State Legislature.

1912: Simon L. Adler of Rochester, NY was re-elected as a member of the State Legislature.

1912: Morris J. Speiser of Philadelphia, PA, was elected to the State Legislature today.

1912: Joseph Rabinowitz was elected Mayor of Woodbine, NJ.

1912: Sigmund J. Gans of Philadelphia, PA, was elected to the State Legislature today.

1912: Jacob Frohlich of New Haven, CT, was elected to the State Legislature today.

1912: Mark Goldberg of New York City was re-elected to the State Legislature.

1912: Henry M. Goldfogle, of New York City was re-elected to the State Legislature.

1912: Isaac Gordon of Boston, Mass, was elected to the State Legislature.

1912: Abraham Greenberg of New York City was elected to the State Legislature.

1912: Maurice Caro of Boston, MA was elected to the State Legislature.

1912: Morris Bernstein of Cleveland, Ohio, was elected State Senator today.

1912: P.C. Cohn of Sacramento, CA was elected to the State Legislature

1912: In Pittsburgh, PA. Adolph Edlis was re-elected Treasure of the School Board.

1912: Mark Eisner of New York City was elected to the State Assembly.

1912: Henry Elgart of Colchester, CT was elected to the State Legislature.

1912: In Rhode Island, Jacob A. Eaton was elected to the State Legislature.

1912: Sam B. Bradner of Benson, AZ was elected as member of the State Constitutional Convention and the State Legislature.

1912: Aaron J. Levy and Jefferson M. Levy both of New York City were re-elected to the State Legislature.

1912: Max Levy of Newport, R.I., was elected to the State Legislature.

1912: Joseph Leonard of Boston, Mass, was elected to the State Legislature.

1912: Sim Leopold of Phoenix, LA, was elected to the State Legislature.

1912: Max M. Neuman of Spokane, Washington, was elected to serve in the State Legislature.

1912: Robert Robinson of Boston, MA, was elected to the State Legislature.

1914: Great Britain declared war on the Ottoman Empire

1914: Birthdate of Alexander Abramovich the native of Moscow who gained fame as Israeli composer Alexander “Sasha” Argov.

1914: Publication of Der Tog (The Day) a Yiddish language newspaper began in New York City with Herman Bernstein as editor and David Shapiro as Publisher

1914: Reverend George Blyth, the Anglican Bishop of Jerusalem who shifted his attempts at conversion from fellow Christians to Jews and Muslims passed away today.

1914: Birthdate of Salomon Gluck, the Swiss born French physician who served in the Resistance and who was murdered by the Nazis along with the other victims aboard the infamous Convoy 73.

1915: “A Munich dispatch to the Vossische Zeitung says that the regulation against Jews becoming officer in the Bavarian Army has been modified.”

1915: Birthdate of Martin Dannenberg the native of Baltimore, MD who served as chairman of the Sun Life Insurance Company and who, while serving with Patton’s Third Army who “discovered an original copy of the Nuremberg Laws signed by Adolf Hitler.”

1916: At Carnegie Hall, Rabbi Stephen S. Wise delivered an address entitled “How Ought I To Vote” in which he “denounced hyphenism in all its phases”

1916: “Rabbi Samuel Schulman delivered a pre-election nonpartisan sermon” this “morning at Temple Beth-El called “Before the Ark of the American Covenant” in which he “likened the act of voting to the annual visit made by the high priest into the innermost sanctuary of the Jewish temple to the presence of the Ark which contained the tablets of testimony” but also decried the political activity of ministers in partisan politics which meant he would not tell anybody for whom he was going to vote.

1916: “Rabbi J.L. Magnes, who was sent to the occupied portions of Poland and Lithuania to study the condition of the Jews” in those countries “and the distribution of relief sent from America told a graphic story of the hardships he had seen at meeting” tonight “of representatives of the American Jewish Relief Committee, the Central Relief Committee and the People’s Relief Committee” during which he predicted that if the war last three or four years, “the Jewish race” will waste away and “there will be very few left.” (Editor’s Note: With all of the emphasis on the Holocaust, we tend to lose sight of the desperate conditions faced by the Jews of Eastern Europe during WW I.)

1917: In Buchanan v. Warley, The Supreme Court unanimously agreed to strike down as unconstitutional a Louisville KY ordinance that made it unlawful for any white or black person to move into and occupy as a residence any house upon any block upon which a greater number of houses were occupied by persons of the opposite color. A white property owner challenged the statute on the ground that it impaired his ability to sell his house, which was situated in an exclusively white neighborhood, to a prospective black buyer. The court held that the statute deprived the white homeowner of his right to dispose of his property without due process of law. The Court reasoned that he should be able to dispose of his property to any prospective purchaser, regardless of race. This was the first race case in which the newly-appointed Justice Brandeis participated and it was perceived by the public at the time to represent a fairly dramatic victory for the cause of Civil Right.  While African Americans and their supporters were pleased with the outcome, it drew the ire of many whites.

1917: Thirty-one year old Rabbi David Goldberg of Corsicana was named today by Secretary Josephus Daniels as “the first Jewish Chaplain of the U.S. Navy” with the rank of Lieutenant Junior Grade.

1923: Following the collapse of the German mark, several thousand impoverished German descended upon Berlin’s Scheunenviertel district, inhabited principally by Ostjudent (Eastern Jews) and for two days beat hundreds of Jews and ransacked nearly a thousand Jewish shops before police managed to put an end to the violence.

1923(26th of Cheshvan, 5684): Pittsburgh, PA attorney and Spanish American War veteran Alfred Cahen passed away today.

1924: Jesse H. Metcalf who as early as June of 1933 would join in the attack on the Nazi treatment of the Jews when he declared “We as a nation can only declare the existence of racial or religious prejudice to be untenable as a national ideal” was elected to the United States from Rhode Island, a position he would hold until 1937.

1928: In “Gangsters Shoot Arnold Rothstein” published today in The Atlanta Constitution reported that the “notorious gangster” is “in serious condition after an attack on a New York Street.”

1930: In Marburg, Germany, historian Wilhelm Mommsen and his wife gave birth to historians Theodor and Hans Mommsen, the latter of which has specialized in studies of the role of Hitler, the Nazis and the German people in the Holocaust.

1931: In the Flatbush section of Brooklyn, former Ann Seidlitz and William Herzenberg gave birth to Leonard Arthur Herzenberg, the Nobel Prize winning immunologist. (As reported by Douglas Martin)

1931: Rufus Daniel Isaacs, 1st Marquess of Reading completed his service as Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs

1933: Dr. Judah L. Magnes, Chancellor of the Hebrew University in Jerusalem announced a program of expansion which will provide fourteen posts for former German scholars including Professors Torczyner, Guttman, Koebner, Lewy and Fraenkel

1936: “A few hours after” Earl Peel and the members of the Royal Commission left for Jerusalem, “W. G. A. Ormsby-Gore, Secretary of State for Colonies announced one of the most sweeping reductions ever made in the number of Jewish labor immigrants to Palestine” sayings “that for the next six months a maximum of only 1,800 labor certificated would be issued” as compared with the 4,500 issued in April before the Arab riots began.

1936: In Bucharist, King Carol received a memorandum from Corneliu Zelea Cordeanu, the leader of the fascist Iron Guard, who had assassinated Premier Ion Duce and other liberal politicians threatening the King with death while declaring that Rumanian youths are opposed to the Little Entente because it is “drenched in the spirit of world Jewry” (The Little Entente was an alliance that was aimed at blocking Hitler’s advances in Central Europe.)

1937(1st of Kislev, 5698): Rosh Chodesh Kislev

1937: CBS radio broadcast the last episode of “The Gumps” a radio sitcom based on the comic strip with scripts written by Irwin Shaw

1937: The Palestine Post reported that an Egged bus driver and two his passengers were wounded when their vehicle was fired on, at the infamous Kilometer 5 of the Jerusalem-Jaffa road. A lone Jewish lorry driver was shot there and wounded. The Egged Bus Company was founded in 1933.  The Hebrew word Egged means “union.” The company was so named because it was formed from the merger of four smaller bus companies.  Today, the Egged Bus Company is the second largest transportation company in the world.

1937: The Palestine Post reported that the Arab terror continued when the Iraqi petroleum pipeline was punctured and set on fire. Shots were fired and a bomb was thrown at the Beisan police station

1937: Hitler chairs a secret conference in which he informs the High Command and others of his racial, geopolitical, and military plans to dominate Europe. The conference is recorded by Colonel Friedrich Hossbach and called after him. Hitler lays out the core of his policy to his military leaders. "The aim of the German policy was to make secure and to preserve the racial community and to enlarge it. It was a question of SPACE." "Germany had the right to greater living space...and its future was whole conditional upon the solving of the need for space." Two countries stood in Germany's way: Britain and France. Hitler details a broad plan for war and preparedness against France, Britain, Italy, and Russia, and analysis each country's military and political position. Note that Italy, which would become a willing ally of Hitler, was considered as a possible enemy only two years prior to the start of WW II.  On the one hand Hitler thought that he could gain most of his goals by bluffing the weak, decadent western powers. At the same time, he knew that he would have to defeat England and France so that he could then fight the ultimate war against the Soviets without fear of a two front war.

1938(11th of Cheshvan): Yiddish poet Abraham Liessin passed away.

1940(4th of Cheshvan, 5701): During World War II, as the Greeks fought against the invading Italians Haham Raphael Joseph Antzelou was killed in the Battle of Kalpaki on the Albanian front. Many Jews of Ioannina, a city in northwest Greece, fought on the Albanian front. The chief of staff of the Greek forces said of them, "The Greek Jews fulfilled their duty in full measure."

1941: Birthdate of Kay Leipzig, an ayshis chayel in the truest sense of the word.

1941: Birthdate of singer and songwriter Art Garfunkel.

1941(15th of Cheshvan, 5702): Seventeen thousand Jews are killed outside Rovno, Ukraine.

1942(25th of Cheshvan, 5703): The Nazis deported the last 1,800 Jews from Ciechanow, Poland.  Jews had lived in the town since the middle of the sixteenth century. During the deportation an SS man politely asks a Jewish woman to hand him her baby. When she complies, the trooper smashes the baby to the street headfirst, killing it. Some of the deportees took part in the uprising at Auschwitz.  Approximately 100 people from the town survived the war but they did not try to restore their community.

1942: Jewish men from Stopnica, Poland, are sent to a slave-labor camp at Skarzysko-Kamienna, while 400 old people and children are shot in the town cemetery. Three thousand others are put on a forced march; many are shot along the way, and survivors are sent to Treblinka.

1942: Peasants in Siedliszcze, Poland, gather scythes in anticipation of the day's roundup of Jews, for which they'll be paid for each Jew caught.

1942: Six hundred Jews from Borislav, Poland, are deported naked to prevent resistance.

1942: In France, 745 Jews, including 35 residents of the Rothschild Old Age Home, are deported from Paris to Auschwitz. After arrival, Jews awaiting entry into the gas chamber spy a truck loaded with corpses but continue on to their deaths

1942: Over the next six days, 1060 Greece-born Jews in and around Paris are seized and deported to Auschwitz Bernhard Lichtenberg, the anti-Nazi priest whom among other things  prayed daily from his pulpit in the St Hedwig Cathedral for the both Jews and Jewish Christians as well as other victims of the regime.

1942: Manfred Silberwasser, Leo Bretholz and a thousand others were deported on convoy 42, operated by the state-owned railway, the Société Nationale des Chemins de fer Français, or S.N.C.F which was headed for Auschwitz and from which the two escaped by prying loose the bars of a small window and jumping while on a curved stretch of rail somewhere in eastern France.

1942: The Gestapo arrested Regina Jonas, the first woman ordained as a rabbi and deported her to Theresienstadt

1942: Birthdate of Richie Scheinblum Bronx-born outfielder for the Kansas City Royals. Scheinblum became the only Jewish switch-hitter (and 7th switch-hitter total) to bat .300 during a full season.

1943: While waiting to be deported to Dachau, 67 year old Bernhard Lichtenberg, the anti-Nazi priest whom among other things prayed daily from his pulpit in the St Hedwig Cathedral for the both Jews and Jewish Christians as well as other victims of the regime died today.

1943: Gertrude Luckner, a Christian social worker involved in the German resistance to Nazism, was arrested by the Gestapo before she could transfer funds destined for the last Jews of Berlin and imprisoned at Ravensbruck concentration camp.

1943(7th of Cheshvan, 5704): Operation "Harvest Festival" continued at Poniatowa as 15,000 Jews were killed in one day.   The children of the Siaulia Ghetto in Lithuania were deported to Birkenau and perished. The Nazis murdered 17,000 prisoners at Majdanek.

1945: This evening, following a second of anti-Jewish rioting in several Libyan cities, “the British authorities, who had been in control of Libya since the defeat of the German-Italian forces there in 1943, imposed a curfew.”  The curfew failed to halt the violence which would continue unabated for at least two more days.

1948: “Ben Gurion reported his cabinet: Jerusalem has as yet hardly enjoyed one night of quiet.’”

1948: Israeli forces retake Yad Mordecai from the Egyptians.

1948: The Provisional State Council, the body that temporarily governed Israel until January of 1949, decided that the Constituent Assembly (later called the Knesset) would have 120 members.

1948: In Béni Saf, French Algeria, millionaire businessman André Lévy and his wife gave birth to Bernard-Henri Levy author of Who Killed Daniel Pearl?

1950: NBC broadcast the first episode of the popular radio program “The Big Show” which owed much of its success to the scripts of Goodman Ace and Selma Diamond.

1950: Chaya and Yehezkel Bornstien, have found refuge in the Rosh Pina ma'abara immigrant transit camp. Both are natives of Lodz, Poland; both escaped to the Soviet Union before the Nazis entered their hometown, and managed to survive the Holocaust. Now they are on a quest to find their daughter Lusia whom they had sent the Zionist Coordination for the Redemption of Jewish Children when they were still living in post-war Poland because of economic duress and the outbreak of anti-Semitic violence as typified by the pogrom at Kielce.

1953: Armed Jordanians murdered a guard in a nighttime attack upon a post along the railway track north of Hadera in the coastal plain.

1953 U.S. premiere of “How To Marry A Millionaire,” a comedy co-starring Lauren Bacall, a cousin of Shimon Peres and future convert to Judaism Marilyn Monroe featuring a score conducted by Alfred Newman.

1955: “Man with the Gun” a Western produced by Samuel Goldwyn, Jr. was released in the United States today.

1956:  During the Sinai Campaign, British and French troops land at the Suez Canal and move south under the pretext of protecting the canal from the warring Egyptians and Israelis.  The Anglo-French force meets a political defeat when the Eisenhower Administration immediately pressures its two NATO allies to promise to remove the troops without delay.  At the same time, the Soviets remind the Israelis that they have missiles capable of hitting the Jewish state with nuclear warheads.  In trying to evaluate the situation Ben Gurion dispatches Golda Meir and Shimon Peres to see if the French will stand by the Israelis if the Soviets move to intervene.  This is another example of Jewish history being played out against a much larger tapestry of world events; in this case the Cold War between the East and the West and the conflict between third world nationalism and European colonialism.

1959: Paddy Chayefsky’s “The Tenth Man” opened on Broadway.

1960: “The Plunderers” a cowboy movie directed and produced by Joseph Pevney, starring Jeff Chandler and with music by Leonard Rosenman was released in the United States today.

1967: The last of Aden's Jews arrived in Israel marking the end of this ancient Jewish community.

1967: Igal Pazi who lost “his right leg below the knee” when he “stepped on a foot mine” while fighting on the Golan during the Six Days War and Judith Cohen-Aloro who was his nurse while he was being treated at the Rambam hospital at Haifa, were married today.

1968: Republican Richard M. Nixon won the presidency, defeating Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey and third-party candidate George C. Wallace.  From the perspective of Jewish history, Nixon’s shining moment came when he ordered the re-supply of Israeli forces during the Yom Kippur War in 1973.  According to some experts, without this, the Israelis well might have been defeated and the state of Israel destroyed. Of course, it was the Nixon Administration that had told the Israelis they could not mount a pre-emptive strike or mobilize their forces when intelligence reports provided unquestionable evidence that the Egyptians were on the verge of attack.  The massive re-supply effort would not have been needed because the Egyptians would have been crushed before the crossing the Canal and the Syrians would never have acted on their own. On the other hand, Nixon had made begun his rise to political power as part of the right wing of the Republican Party which hid a streak of anti-Semitism behind its domestic Red Hunting policies.  Also, Nixon’s voice as captured on his White House tapes portrayed a man haunted by anti-Semitism and a belief in Jewish conspiracies.

1974: Richard Stone was elected to the U.S. Senate from Florida

1975(1st of Kislev, 5736): Rosh Chodesh Kislev

1975(1st of Kislev, 5736): American author and critic Lionel Trilling passed away at the age of 70.

1975: In Jerusalem, Meira Diskin and Jacob Shaham gave birth pianist Orli Shaham, the sister of violinist Gil Shaham and the wife of conductor David Robertson.

1979(15th of Cheshvan, 5740): Al Capp the cartoonist who created the comic strip Lil' Abner passed away at the age of 70.  The eastern Jew created the imaginary hillbilly community of Dog Patch complete with Ma and Pa Yokum, Daisy Mae, Marryin’ Sam, and the ever popular Schmoos (rhymes with Schmooze and reminds one of the descriptions of manna in the Bible).

1981: “Eighty Hebrew teachers in Moscow, some of whom were under constant surveillance, were individually ordered to stop teaching.

1981(8th of Cheshvan, 5742): Eighty-year old Irving J. Pozen, the husband of Berte Pozen and the father of Walter Pozen and Marilyn Krinzman who “was an executive for the B.V.D. Corporation and International Ship Suppliers of Hoboken, NJ” before serving “as director of procurement for the Job Corps from 1961 to 1968” passed away today Suburban Hospital in Bethesda, MD.

1984(10th of Cheshvan, 5745): The Hon. Ivor Goldsmid Samuel Montagu (23 April 1904, London, a British filmmaker, screenwriter, producer, film critic, writer, table tennis player and apparent Soviet spy passed away.

1987(13th of Cheshvan, 5748): Elimelekh Rimalt passed away. A native of Galicia, he was an ordained Rabbi who earned a PhD in psychology.  He made Aliyah in 13.  A member of the Knesset fro Likud, he served as Minister of the Postal Services in 1969 and 1970.

1989 (7th of Cheshvan, 5750):  Pianist Vladimir Horowitz passed away at the age of 85. (As reported by Bernard Holland)

1989: In “The Legends of Kibbutz Country,” published today, Mathew Nevisky describes the role that the Jezreel Valley has played in Jewish History and the efforts that have been made to preserve the history of this unique part of ancient and modern Israel.  The article reads in part, “Overseen by the brooding heights of Mount Tabor and Mount Gilboa, the Jezreel Valley resonates with memories of ancient Israelite kings and warrior-judges. In modern times, the same area was the scene of the Zionist movement's pioneering efforts in land reclamation, agriculture and self-defense. To Israelis these achievements, and the people of the Jezreel, like Moshe Dayan, have almost mythic significance. Accordingly, the Jezreel is dotted with almost as many museums devoted to the founding of modern Israel as it is with archeological sites revealing the biblical past. To the foreign visitor, who too often is shunted around the valley to the flashier tourist sites in Galilee or along the coast, the Jezreel heartland offers insight into another aspect of Israel.”

1990 (17th of Cheshvan, 5751): Meir Kahane was murdered by an Arab terrorist.

1991(28th of Cheshvan, 5752): Robert Maxwell passed away at the age of 68. Born Ján Ludvík Hoch in pre-war Czechoslovakia, Maxwell became a British media magnate.

1993: “Flesh and Bone” produced by Mark Rosenberg and Paula Weinstein and co-starring James Caan and Gwyneth Paltrow was released in the United States today.

1993: The family of Hannah Szenes living in Israel was informed today that a Hungarian military court convened after the fall of the Communist regime had officially exonerated her.

1995: President Clinton is scheduled to leave today for Jerusalem where he will attend the funeral of Prime Minister Rabin.

1995(12th of Cheshvan, 5756): Eighty-eight year old “percussionist and drum teacher” Max Abrams, the Glasgow native who was “regarded as one of Britain’s foremost drum teachers” and the author of “50 jazz tutor books” passed away today.

1995: “Assassination In Israel” published today described the reaction of American leaders including President Clinton and former Secretary of State Warren Christopher to the murder of Prime Minister Rabin.

1996: United States President Bill Clinton defeats Republican challenger Robert J. Dole and Reform party candidate H. Ross Perot to become the first democratic president since Franklin Roosevelt to win a second term in office. Three of the major events of Clinton’s second term centered around Jews.  The first was the Monica Lewinsky Scandal.  The second was the Camp David Peace initiative that Clinton mounted in 2000.  The meetings between Ehud Barak and Yassar Arafat failed to produce a peace treaty; a failure for which Clinton blamed Arafat.  The third was the pardon of Marc Rich issued on Clinton’s last day in office.  In one of those ironies of life, Rich was represented by Lewis “Scooter” Libby.  Libby, who was Jewish would end up being denied a pardon by President Bush for his role in the case of Valier Plame; a denial that would cause a public split between Bush and Dick Cheney.

1996: The Coming Street Cemetery, the Charleston South Carolina burial site that is one of the oldest in the United States having been founded in 1762 was listed on the National Register of Historic Places today.

1997(5th of Cheshvan, 5758):  Isaiah Berlin passed away at the age of 88 (As reported by Marilyn Berger)

1999(26th of Cheshvan, 5760): Sixty-seven year old collapsed today in the House of Lords and “was pronounced dead in the ambulance” taking him to the hospital.

1999: A.M. Rosenthal wrote the last of his twice-weekly “On My Mind” columns today entitle “Please Read This Column” which was the name of the first of these columns written in 1987.

1999: “The Insider” a film based on The Man Who Knew Too Much by Marie Brenner, directed and produced by Michael Mann who wrote the screenplay with Eric Roth was released in the United States today.

1999: “The Bone Collector” a thriller produced by Martin and Michael Bregman was released in the United States today.

2000: The New York Times featured reviews of books by Jewish authors and/or about topics of Jewish interest including The Bialy Eaters: The Story of a Bread and a Lost World by Mimi Sheraton

2000: Susa Berman, the daughter of Las Vegas David Berman wrote to Robert Durst (who would later be charged with her murder) “expressing the hope that her financial entreaties would not ruin their friendship.”

2002: After over 20 years in elected public life, Linda Lingle was elected as Hawaii’s first female and first Jewish governor on. Lingle and former Vermont Governor Madeleine Kunin are the only Jewish women governors in U.S. history. Lingle, a St. Louis native, moved to Hawaii after graduating from California State University at Northridge. She began working as the public information officer for the Hawai'i Teamsters and Hotel Workers Union in Honolulu. In 1976, she founded and became publisher of the Moloka'i Free Press, intended to serve Moloka'i's 6,000 residents. In 1980 Lingle was elected to the Maui County Council where she served for ten years. In 1990 she was elected Maui County Mayor, the youngest person and first woman to ever hold that role. Lingle first ran for governor in 1998 but lost by less than 1 percent of the vote. In 2002 Lingle, a Republican won the election by more than 4 percent. As governor, Lingle has worked to balance the state budget and promote tourism, while improving the quality of life by fighting crime and drug abuse and increasing accessibility to quality health care. In May 2004, Lingle signed a Memorandum of Understanding between the state of Hawaii and the government of Israel to encourage cooperation concerning agriculture and aquaculture research and development. "[Being Jewish has] helped my political career in Hawaii," says Lingle, "because it has given me a better understanding of diversity, which in turn helps me to connect with citizens of varying religious and ethnic backgrounds."

2003: At a Jewish forum in New York City, George Soros “partially attributed a resurgence in anti-Semitism to the policies of the Bush administration and the Sharon administration” as well as the perception that “Jews rule the world” based on his role in affairs.

2005:  Haaretz and The Jerusalem Post reported that the Secretary General of the United Nations had canceled his upcoming trip to Iran.  The canceled trip was another manifestation of the international community’s disgust with Iran’s call for the destruction of the state of Israel.  How long this expression of goodwill towards the Jewish state will last is unknown.  But for now, at least, Israel bashing is not a “cool” thing to do.

2006: The New York Times Sunday book section features a review of David Mamet’s, The Wicked Son: Anti-Semitism, Self-Hatred, and the Jews.

2006: Under the title “His devils made him do it,” Jeffrey Meyers reviewed Isaac B. Singer: A Life by Florence Noiville, translated from the French by Catherine Temerson.

2006: Under the title “The Altered States,” The Times of London reviewed American Vertigo: On the Road from Newport to Guantanamo by Bernard-Henri Levy, the biographer of Daniel Pearl.

2006:  Opening of the 10th Annual Dayton Jewish Book Fair.

2006: Yuli Tamir named acting Science and Technology Minister.

2007: Jerome Groopman, a physician at Harvard Medical School, discusses How Doctors Think at the Sixth & I Historic Synagogue (formerly Adas Israel Synagogue) in Washington, D.C.

2007: In a Time magazine article entitled “The Genius Who Wanted to Be a Hack” Lev Grossman reviews Gentlemen of the Road by Michael Chabon.

2007(24th of Cheshvan, 5768): Eighty-eight year Dr. Michael Solomons  “a distinguished gynecologist, a pioneer of family planning in Ireland and a veteran of the 1983 constitutional amendment campaign” who was the second son of Gertrude Levy and Dr. Bethel Solomons  passed away today.

2007: In Canada, the Quebec Human Rights Tribunal decided that a Jewish hospital must pay $15,000 to female workers denied shifts. Officials at the Jewish General Hospital in Montreal said they haven't decided whether to appeal a human rights tribunal ruling that orders the institution to pay damages for denying full-time work to female employees because of a gender policy. The hospital has to pay $15,000 to Mary Smith and Jennifer Bennett, two female workers who complained they were deprived of employment opportunities because of their sex. The plaintiffs said they were denied shifts and could not work full time because of a hospital policy that allowed patients to refuse treatment by staff members of the opposite sex. The women said they were denied access to permanent jobs because the positions were reserved for men, a "glass ceiling" that affected their families because of reduced income and job security. In the ruling, the Quebec Human Rights Tribunal said it had to weigh the rights of patients and freedom of religion against the rights of workers to be treated equally at work, without gender discrimination. The hospital said the ruling was disappointing and defended its practices, but said it was still considering its options. The hospital, which describes itself as non-denominational, said it endeavors to offer an environment that is respectful of Jewish values. It adopted the patient gender rule in 1999 to accommodate certain patients, with the hospital union's sanction. About a third of patients at the hospital are Jewish, but only a minority of them is Orthodox and follows Talmudic laws prescribed in the Torah, which forbids any physical contact between a man and a woman who are not married. The only exception is for medical care from a doctor.

2008: New York premiere of “The Little Traitor.”  “Based on Panther in the Basement by world-renowned novelist, Amos Oz, this beautiful story of an implausible friendship between an amiable British soldier and a spirited, 11-year-old Israeli militant who wants the occupying imperialists off his land takes place just a few months before Israel achieves independent statehood. When Proffy Liebowitz meets British officer Sergeant Dunlop, he's reprimanded for roaming the streets after dark and breaking curfew. They later become friends, but town officials soon learn of their secret and accuse the boy of being a traitor. The ensuing events will forever change their respective outlook on life.”

2008: Following a successful run on Broadway, Jake Ehrenreich’s “A Jew Grows in Brooklyn has its Chicagoland” premier at the North Shore Center for the Performing Arts.

2008: The New Republic magazine includes reviews of The Life and Thought of Hans Jonas: Jewish Dimensions by Christian Wiese and Memoirs by Hans Jonas; edited by Christian Wiese and translated by Krishna Winston.

2009: “Ambassadors and diplomats from 44 countries, military attaches from 27 armies in the world, and the international media were invited by the IDF and the Foreign Ministry to show them the weapons and munitions seized from the  ship.”

2009: The 40th Annual Book Festival sponsored by the JCC of Greater Washington opens with presentations by Steve Roberts, author of From Every End of This Earth and Peter Yarrow author of Day is Done.

2010: A Free Tour of Herodian in Honor/Memory of Ehud Netzer z"l the famous archeologist who passed away on October 28 is scheduled to take place in Jerusalem

2010: A new documentary, “Jews and Baseball, an American Love Story,” which opened today in New York, is a film that largely succeeds at telling the story of a great American people (the Jews that is) via the tale of a great American pastime. It may not be a grand slam, but it’s at least a double. (As reported by Jordana Horn)

2010: Agudas Achim in Iowa City is scheduled to host its annual New Comers’ Shabbat Dinner

2010:  Friends and family share in the joy of Kay Leipzig’s birthday.

2010: It was reported today that “new findings contradict the conventional belief that Italians began to enforce anti-Semitic laws only after German troops occupied the country in 1943, and then reluctantly. In a spate of studies, many of them based on a little-publicized Italian government report commissioned in 1999, researchers have uncovered a vast wartime record detailing a systematic disenfranchisement of Italy’s Jews, beginning in the summer of 1938, shortly before the Kristallnacht attacks

2010: The New York Times featured a review of “I Remember Nothing And Other Reflections: by Nora Ephron.

2011: Nadina Wintraub (piano), Yelena Tishin (violin), Avraham Leventhal (viola) and Dmitry Golderman (cello) are scheduled to perform “Favorite Piano Quarters” as part of The Best of Chamber Music program at Edin-Tamar Music Center.

2011: Opening night of the 6th Annual JCC of Northern Virginia Book Festival

2011: Remembrance Shabbat is observed at Temple Judah in Cedar Rapids commemorating three major November Events: The Balfour Declaration, Kristallnacht and the UN vote approving partition which created the Jewish State.

2011(8th of Cheshvan): Yahrzeit of Avraham Elimelch ben Yosef Dov, whose nickname was Melech and whose English name was Abraham Levin, of blessed memory.

2011: As Jews read Lech-Lecha, will any Rabbi deliver a sermon tying the ancient words from Bereshit with the anniversary of the Balfour Declaration which was observed 3 days ago?

2011: Israel Defense Forces aircraft struck targets in the southern Gaza Strip this evening, thwarting an attempt by Islamic Jihad to launch a rocket into Israel..

2011: "It will take a year, two years, but I will return. I will never leave you again." These words were written by missing IAF navigator Ron Arad, whose plane was shot down over Lebanon in 1986, to his wife Tami and his daughter Yuval. Arad's diaries were obtained by Channel 2 and shown today. He most likely wrote them during his first weeks in captivity. The notes were written on pages ripped from books Arad's captors gave him. "To my dearest of all, Tami and Yuval, I am trying to forget you because I get a lump on my throat with every memory," he wrote. "I love you, and you are the only reason keeping me from thinking about the worst of all. I promise you this at least: I will return. A year, two years – I will never leave you again, even if I have to stop flying. We will have a warm and loving and good home like we never had." Arad writes to his wife Tami: "I had a dream about you last night. It was wonderful. We both met on the grass after a long workday and talked as usual, and I was with you again. I woke up in a sweat, but it gave me a few minutes of happiness." Arad's letters remained in Lebanon for 20 years. They were returned to Israel three years ago as part of a swap deal with Hezbollah (in which Israel received the bodies Eldad Regev and Ehud Goldwasser). In some of the letters Arad wrote the address of his parents' house in Hod Hasharon, suggesting he believed his captors would mail them to his loved ones

2012: The Palestinians will press ahead with a bid to upgrade their status at the United Nations, a senior official said today, brushing off a request by Israel to halt the initiative. Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu has renewed his call for an immediate resumption of peace talks and has warned Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas against making any unilateral moves in the UN General Assembly. (Jerusalem Post)

2012: The UJA-Federation of New York released $10 million in Hurricane Sandy emergency relief aid to its network agencies and synagogues this morning (As reported by JTA)

2012: Microsoft launched its Windows 8 smartphones in Israel today

2012: At the University of Chicago, Professor Hanna Holbron Gray is scheduled to deliver a lecture entitled “European Émigré Scholars and the American Academy After 1933."

2012: “Coffee and Conversation for Holocaust Survivors” is scheduled to take place the Illinois Holocaust Museum and Education Center in Skokie, Illinois.

2012: The Jewish Genealogical Society of the Conejo Valley and Ventura County (JGSCV) is scheduled to present: "From the Spanish Inquisition to the Present: A Search for Jewish Roots"

2013: The five day bike ride sponsored by the Arava Institute Hazon that began in Jerusalem is scheduled to end today in Eilat.

2013: Retire Ambassador Daniel C. Kurtzer, the S. Daniel Abraham Professor in Middle East Policy Studies at the Woodrow Wilson School of Princeton University is scheduled to talk about the conflicts in the Middle East at the San Diego Jewish Book Fair.

2013: In London, the Pears Institute For The Study Of Anti-Semitism is scheduled to sponsor by Professor Philip Spencer on “The Recurrence of Genocide Since the Holocaust.”

2013: US Secretary of State John Kerry arrived in Israel this evening and visited Rabin Square in Tel Aviv, the location of Prime Minister Yizhak Rabin's murder on November 4, 1995. "I can promise Israelis that America will stand by the side of Israel every step of the way," Kerry said. (As reported by Gilad Morag)

2013: Residents in 38 municipalities – from the tiny town of Migdal, near Tiberias, to Petah Tikva – voted today in second-round elections for mayor. (As reported by Henry Rome and Lahav Harkov)

2014: For the first time ever “Cats” is scheduled to be performed in Israel starting today at Tel Aviv’s Charles Bronfman Auditorium.

2014: In Sydney, “Night Will Fall” and “Regarding Susan Sontag” are scheduled to be shown at the Jewish International Film Festival.

2014: Christie’s is scheduled to sell Schiele’s 1910 watercolor “Town on the Blue River,” today in conjunction with a restitution agreement that treats the work as looted art and provides compensation to the heirs of “Fritz Grünbaum, a Viennese cabaret performer whose large art collection was inventoried by Nazi agents after he was sent to the Dachau concentration camp, where he died.”

2014: The Skirball Center is scheduled to host “Israel in the Eyes of the Media: From Menachem Begin to Today.”

2014:Arsonist responsible for setting fire to a kosher supermarket during July 20 riot in Sarcelles was sentenced to four years in prison.” (As reported by Stephanie Butnick)

2014: “Border Police officer Jedan Assad, 38, from Beit Jann, a Druze village the father to a three-year-old boy whose wife is five months pregnant was murdered this moring and 14 others injured when a Hamas terrorist “plowed his vehicle into a crowd of people at a light rail station along the seam-line between East and West Jerusalem” this morning. (As reported by Spencer Ho)

2014: This evening, three soldiers were injured when a vehicle driven by a Hamas terrorist deliberately struck them. (As reported by Ilan Ben Zion)

2014: Results early today showed that Lee Zeldin, a New York State Senator has been elected to the House of Representatives from a district in Long Island making him the only Republican to have been accomplished such a feat, making him Eric Cantor’s replacement for this singular honor.

2015: “Blood” an exhibition that explores this subject through “manuscripts, prints, Jewish ritual and ceremonial objects, art, film, literature and cultural ephemera to present a rich exploration of how blood can unite and divide, reflecting on over 2,000 years of history” is scheduled to open at the Jewish Museum of London.

2015: Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks is scheduled to deliver the keynote address at “Rising Hatred: Confronting Global & Local Anti-Semitism” hosted by the Illinois Holocaust Museum & Education Center.

2015: “Bringing a message of peace through music, the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra” is scheduled to perform this evening at Carnegie Hall/

2015: “A Borrowed Identity” and “Dough” are scheduled to be shown at the Rutgers Jewish Film Festival.

2015: Funeral services are scheduled to be held in South Bend, Indiana for Harry Portman, the father of Rabbi Jeff Portman.

2016: The 20th UK International Jewish Film Festival is scheduled to open tonight in London with a screening of “Indignation” which will be attended by director James Schamus.

2016: “Big: The Musical” featuring music by David Shire and with a book by John Weidman, the son of Jerome Weidman is scheduled to open at the Theatre Royal Plymouth.

2016: The Illinois Holocaust Museum and Education is scheduled tours of its “Karkomi Holocaust Exhibition.”

2016(4th of Cheshvan, 5777):  Parahat Noach – Noah; for more see http://downhomedavartorah.blogspot.com/

2016: In Toronto, as part of Holocaust Education Week, Jennifer Teege is scheduled to discuss her book, My Grandfather Would Have Shot Me: A Black Woman Discovers Her Family's Nazi Past

 

 

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