Tuesday, May 17, 2016

This Day, May 18, In Jewish History by Mitchell A. Levin


May 18

323BCE: Alexander dies at the age of 32.  Despite the legend, there is no proof that Alexander ever came to Jerusalem.  He did pass through Judea on his way to conquer Egypt and on his way from the victory.  He left the Jews in peace to practice their religion and to live in a semi-independent status.  This was his standard treatment for all those who did not oppose him.  He and his subordinates encouraged Jews to settle in Egypt and throughout Asia Minor.  The Jews were allowed to live in their own communities where they were governed by their own councils and courts.  Alexander was viewed as an enlightened monarch in much the way that Cyrus the Great had been.

363: The first of a series of earthquakes that would last for two days rocked the Galilee.

576: Over 500 Jews were forcibly baptized in Clermont-Ferrand, France.

1096(4856): Jews of Worms (Germany) were massacred by Crusaders. The survivors hid in the Bishop's palace for one week, after which they were either murdered or forcibly baptized.

1152: Henry II, King of England marries Eleanor of Aquitaine. This marriage produced two future Kings of England – Richard I (known as the Lionhearted) and King John, the monarch who signed the Magna Charta.  For the Jews, Henry’s reign was an improvement over that of his predecessor, King Stephen.  While Richard was semi-protective of his Jewish subjects, they suffered at the hands of those who wielded power while he was off crusading or fighting to protect his lands in France.  In the first part of his reign, John maintained a positive relationship with his Jewish subjects, but as time went on he turned on them and made unrealistic financial demands on the community.

1268: Following the Battle of Antioch the Principality of Antioch, a crusader state, falls to Baibars I the Mamluk Sultan. During the Mamluk Sultanate, there was an upswing in anti- dhimmī feeling although much of this was really aimed at the Christians who held positions in the government and the Jews were just “tangential beneficiaries” of this attitude. 

1291: A year after the Jews were expelled from England, after a two month siege, the fortress at Acre (Israel) falls to the Fatimid Egyptians, thus bringing about the end of the Crusades. Subsequently, the various crusading armies never succeeded in uniting as a cohesive force. The infighting and separate treaties defeated them as well as the Fatimid armies. “The founder of the Fatimid dynasty was Ubeidullah, known as the Mahdi. He was accused of Jewish ancestry by his adversaries the Abbasids, who declared him the grandson of Abdullah ibn Maymun, by a Jewess.”

1418: Representatives from the Jewish communities of central and northern Italy met to discuss raising funds for self-defense as well as instituting sumptuary regulations so as "not to show off in the presence of Gentiles." It is plausible that the issuing of these sumptuary regulations, influenced Pope Martin V to issue a protective Bull the following year

1530: The Edict of Innsbruck issued today confirmed a charter of protection for the Jews of Germany that Josel of Rosheim had obtained from Charles V shortly after he had “ascended the throne at Accehn in 1520.”

1721: In Madrid, 96 year old Maria Barbara Carillo was burned alive making her the oldest known victim of the Inquisition.

1729(19th of Iyar, 5489): Mordeccai Mokiach, the father of Judah Lob Mokiach and the grandfather of David Berline Mokiach and Isaiah Berlin Mokiach who preached that Sabbatai Zevi, the “False Messiah” would return in three years to finish his work, passed away today in Pressburg.

1792(26th of Iyar): Canadian Jewish leader Levy Solomons passed away

1794: Betty Hart, the first American female convert to Judaism, married Moses Nathans

1825(1st of Sivan, 5585): Rosh Chodesh Sivan

1832: Eliakim Carmoly, a French-born Talmudist and author, was named to serve as a rabbi in Brussels.

1830: In Keszthely, Hungary Chazan Ruben Goldmark and his wife gave birth to violinist and composer Karl Godmark.

1837: In Saxony, the Jews “were empowered to organize themselves into communities with chapels of their own, and were granted citizenship, with the exception of municipal and political rights.

1839: In the Netherlands Jacob Hirschel Kann and Amalie de Jonge gave birth to Henrik Jacob Kann

1847(3rd of Sivan, 5607): Moses Calmus Lissa passed away

1854: District Rabbi Jonas Wiesner and his wife Estra gave birth to Rosa Wiesner Lowi.

1854: Fifty-two year old French journalist Samuel Ustazade Silvestre de Sacy “the son of Antoine-Isaac Silvestre de Sacy” “was elected to the Académie française” today.

1860: In Chicago, Illinois, the Republican Party nominates Abraham Lincoln for President of the United States. Lewis Naphtali Dembitz, a 28 year old lawyer from Louisville, Kentucky, was one of the three delegates who put Lincoln’s name in nomination. Dembitz was the uncle of Louis Dembitz Brandeis, who would emulate his uncle’s legal career and then excel it as the first Jewish Supreme Court Justice.

1865(22nd of Iyar): David ben Moses Frankel, editor of Sulamith, passed away.

1868: As the United States entered into a Presidential election year, The New York Times published excerpts an article from the Jewish Messenger describing the role of “Hebrews” in the political life of Europe and the United States.  In the United States, Jews are not “a compact body for political purposes…In the coming campaign, Hebrews will work, and talk, and vote precisely according to their convictions as citizens and in no respect will their political action be dependent upon their religious character as a body.  There is no national Hebrew vote.”

1870: “Mount Sinai Hospital” published today reported that the New York Times was wrong when it said that Mount Sinai Hospital was maintained by Jews for use by Jews.  “The institution is supported by Jewish contribution and its directors” are Jewish “but it has always opened its doors to patients without the slightest regard to creed.”  [In fact the hospital had been started before the Civil War to serve the needs of immigrants and indigent Jews.  During the Civil War that role definitely changed as it became a treatment cite for thousands of Union wounded beginning with McClellan’s Peninsula Campaign in 1862.] 

1872:  Birthdate of Lord Bertrand Russell, British mathematician and philosopher.  Lord Russell was pro-Palestinian describing them as innocent refugees and describing Israel as occupying land ‘given’ by a foreign power to the Jewish people for the creation of a new state.

1873: An informal reception was held today the recently opened home for aged and infirmed Hebrews at 63rd street and Lexington Avenue. The building, which can accommodate 50 individuals, is currently home to 26 women and 2 men. They range in age from 70 to 95.  Mrs. P.J. Joachimsen is President of the Board of Directors.

1876: Wyatt Earp starts work as a lawman in Dodge City, Kansas. When he died, Earp’s ashes were buried in a Jewish cemetery in Colma, California.  No, the famous marshal was not Jewish but his wife Josie was and her family had enough power and influence to wriggle around the laws forbidding such burials.

1876: In Ogdensburg, NY, Mordecai Joseph Brill and Lottie Tumim gave birth to Abram Brill, a graduate of the University of Cincinnati and Hebrew Union College who served as the rabbi at Congregation Beth El in Helena, Arkansas before moving to Greenville, Mississippi where he also served as Rabbi.

1876: The New York Times featured a review of “Stray Studies From England and Italy” a collection of essays by John Richard Green.  “Mr. Green shows how mistaken the modern conception” is when it comes to understanding the treatment of English Jews during the Middle Ages.  “That conception is accurately represented by Scott’s picture of Isaac of York in “Ivanhoe,” timid, silent crouching under oppression.  The Jew was really…the favorite ‘chattel’ of the king was protected by the crown not only against the people but against the law. Each Hebrew settlement in England was secured from the common taxation, the common justice, the common obligations of Englishman.  The Jewry was a town within a town, with its own language, its peculiar dress, commerce, law and religion.  No bailiff could penetrate it; the Church itself was even powerless against the synagogue which it contained.  In England, at least, the attitude of the Jew was to the end, one of haughty defiance.  His extortion was sheltered from the common law.  His bonds were kept under the royal seal.  Heavy penalties were enforced against outbreaks of popular violence upon the Jews.  Mentioning the story of the Red King’s forbidding the conversion of a Jew, because a valuable property would be lost to him.” [Editor’s note – The Red King may refer to the third son of William the Conqueror, William II who was known as William Rufus.  Green was an English clergyman who turned to writing histories when his health forced him to leave the pulpit.  His description stands in stark contrast to the exploitation that English Jews suffered and makes no mention of their expulsion.

1879: An article published today "The Family Sentiment in Americans" claims that people in the United States are changing their views about family history and genealogy saying that "next to the Jews, we are becoming the genealogical nation on the face of the earth."

1879: A prominent New York banker who is a member of Temple Emanu-El said today that Lewis May, one of the most outspoken advocates for replacing Saturday morning services with Sunday morning serves has just been re-elected as the congregation’s President.  In his acceptance address, Mr. May expressed a personal distaste for the change  but said he recognized it as a necessity since many of the younger men belonging to the Temple could not attend services on Saturday for commercial reasons.

1879: An article published today entitled “Some Old Graveyards” describes early burial sites in New York City including one on the east side of the New Bowery below Chatham square known as the Olivers Street Burying Ground which was the original cemetery belonging to Shearith Israel, also known as the Nineteenth Street Congregation.  The plot was conveyed to the congregation by Noyes Willey of London who received thirty English Pounds for the land. The Jews had been using the land for burials since the 17th century since there are tombstones there bearing the dates of 1669 and 1684. The congregation formally stopped using this cemetery in 1820 when a city ordinance banned burials in that part of the city. 

1880: Rosa Sonneschein read “The Pioneers: An Histotricial Esssay” at a meeting of the Society of Pioneers.

1880: In Szczecin, Heinemann Vogelstein and his wife gave birth to their third son banker and industrialist Theodor Vogelstein.

1890: Today’s “Amusements” column includes a review of “The Shatchen” which opened at the Star Theatre last week.  M.B. Curtis dominates the comedy with his “droll caricature” of the German Jewish businessman.

1890: “For An Educational Fund” published today described the successful Strawberry Festival sponsored by the Young Men’s Hebrew Association during which three thousand attendees raising $3,500 that will go to the association’s educational department.

1891: “Oriental Records” published today contains a detailed review of Records of the Past, an English translations of the Ancient Monuments of Egypt and Western Asia, edited by A. H. Sayce

1891(10th of Iyar): Rabbi Hillel Lichtenstein, leader of Hungarian Jewry, passed away

1893: “Hardships of Russian Jews” published today described the benefits of efforts by the United States to lessen the suffering Jews living under the Czar.  Doing so would cut down on the number of immigrants coming to the United States and at the same time would lessen the burden on those Americans trying to find jobs and homes for immigrants from Poland and Russia.

1893(3rd of Sivan, 5653): In Pennsylvania, Isaac Rosenwig and Harris Blank “the only people of the Jewish faith ever executed for murder in this country” were hug after being found guilty of murdering eighteen year old Jacob Marks, a peddler whom they had robbed of his goods.

1894: Members of the Board of Trustees of the Hebrew Benevolent and Orphan Asylum Society were those who attended the funeral of Sigmund J. Bach as requested by Myer Stern and the Board of Trustees.

1895: Justice Ingram gave the managers of the Home for Aged and Infirm Hebrews of New York City to mortgage its property at 106th Street and Columbus Avenue to the Bowery Savings Bank for $75, 000.

1896: The United States Supreme Court rules in Plessy v. Ferguson that “separate but equal” is constitutional.  This decision marked the legal nadir in the field of civil rights in general and race relations in particular.  It was from this pit that several organizations, many of them funded by Jews and/or with a statistically disproportionate Jewish involvement, had to climb until the High Court would declare in 1954 that separate but equal was inherently unequal.

1896: Based on information supplied by The London Times, the New York Times reported today that the work of the Jewish Colonization Association will continue despite the recent death of its founder and benefactor, Baron Hirsch.  Dr. S.H. Goldschmidt of Paris will now service as President of the Association with assistance from Herbert G. Lousade of the Anglo-Jewish Association of London.  Currently, 1,222 families occupy the 225,000 acres in Argentina under the association’s control.

1897: Anti-Semitic violence broke out in Algeria when “the main synagogue of Nestaganem, Algeria was sacked by anti-Jewish rioters.”

1898: During the Spanish American War, 2nd Lt. Charles Wolf, Sergeant Charles Olschefskie and Privates Simon J. Bush, Simon Freund and Samuel Shapiro were among those in Company A of the 1st Connecticut Volunteer Infantry who were mustered into the United States Army.

1898: During the Spanish American War, Corporal John Fehliman of Kansas City and Privates Samuel Marolis, Philip Steinman, Wlater Gans, Levi Cubine, Adolph Rubel and Charles B. Solomon (the last two from Mexico, MO) were among those who part of the 5th Missouri Volunteer Infantry which was mustered into federal service at Jefferson Barracks, MO.

1899: Randolph Guggenheimer, President of the Municipal Council will the deliver the address at this afternoon’s ceremonies dedicated the new Hebrew Charities Building at 21st Street and Second Avenue.

1899(9th of Sivan, 5659): Fifty year old Julius Hirsch , native of Mannheim, Germany who came to New York In 1870 where he became “a prominent member of the Produce Exchange” passed away today.

1900: In an article entitled “Topical Study” published today in Die Welt Isaac Rulf warned Jews of the danger presented by an increase in anti-Semitism in Germany, including the possibility of murder by the millions. Ruif died a year later but his children did not escape the Holocaust. One son died at Auschwitz and the other committed suicide before he could be shipped to the camps.

1900 In Pilsen, “journalist and theatre director Julius Hirsch and his wife Camilla gave birth to David Hirsch the actor and director known as Wolfgang Heinz.

1901: Herzl is called to the palace again. He is presented a tie-pin with yellow stones. Herzl hands out the sum of 40.000 francs to Nouri Bey and Crespi for having brought the audience about.

1902: Herzl receives a letter from Constantinople that his letter concerning a request for the creation of an Israelite University in Jerusalem was submitted to the Sultan.

1902” “East Side Boycotters Meet and Organize” published in the New York Times described the formation of The Ladies’ Anti-Beef Trust Association which plans to establish co-operative stores if the price of beef being sold on the Lower East Side is not lowered.

1903: The Times of London published a letter from Vyacheslav von Plehve, the Russian Minister of the Interior to the district’s governor, dated 12 days before the riots known as the Kishinev Pogroms, advising the governor not to act against rioters. “The Russian government asserted that it was a forgery and provided a bogus claim that the pogroms had started when a Jewish carousel owner hit a Christian woman. Christians defended themselves and then the Jews attacked them, killing one gentile.”

1903: Arthur Paul Nicholas Cassini, the Russian Ambassador to the United States justified the Pogrom at Kishinev during an interview given today.
There is in Russia, as in Germany and Austria, a feeling against certain of the Jews. The reason for this unfriendly attitude is found in the fact that the Jews will not work in the field or engage in agriculture. They prefer to be money lenders. ... The situation in Russia, so far as the Jews are concerned is just this: It is the peasant against the money lender, and not the Russians against the Jews. There is no feeling against the Jew in Russia because of religion. It is as I have said—the Jew ruins the peasants, with the result that conflicts occur when the latter have lost all their worldly possessions and have nothing to live upon. There are many good Jews in Russia, and they are respected. Jewish genius is appreciated in Russia, and the Jewish artist honored. Jews also appear in the financial world in Russia. The Russian Government affords the same protection to the Jews that it does to any other of its citizens, and when a riot occurs and Jews are attacked the officials immediately take steps to apprehend those who began the riot, and visit severe punishment upon them."

1904: Birthdate of Senator Jacob K Javits.  Born in New York, Javits graduated from NYU Law School.  He served in the Army during World II.  Following the war he became active in Republican politics in New York.  Before coming to the Senate, Javits served in the House of Representatives and as Attorney-General for the state of New York.  Javits was a leader of the liberal wing of the Republican Party and staunch supporter of the Civil Rights movement.  Javits served until January, 1981.  Having been defeated he resumed his law practice and lectured at Columbia.  He passed away in 1986.

1905: In Vienna, Kamilla (Feitler) and Siegmund Zeisl gave birth to composer Erich Zeisl

1905: Frederick Kerry arrived in the United States.  Now a Roman Catholic, at birth Kerry was a Jew named Fritz Kohn.  He and his Jewish wife Ida were baptized in 1901 to avoid the stigma associated with being Jewish in Austria.  Frederick Kerry is the grandfather of Senator John Kerry, the Democratic candidate for President of the United States.  At least two of his relatives perished in the Holocaust.

1910: Turkish Minister of Education advocates adoption of Hebrew as national language of Turkish Jews.

 1910: Franz Kafka and a few of his friends gathered to observe Halley’s Comet.

1911: Bruno Walter was at the deathbed of Gustav Mahler who died today at the age of 50.  Born Jewish, Mahler converted to Catholicism, so he could become head of the court opera in Austria.  His conversion did not spare him the contempt of his enemies.

1912: In Philadelphia, PA, Russian Jewish immigrants gave birth to Richard Saxs who as Richard

Brooks gained fame as film writer, director and producer. Brooks was received Oscar nominations for the screenplays for Blackboard Jungle, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, In Cold Blood and The Professionals.  He won an Academy Award in 1960 for Elmer Gantry.  

1913: In Hawthorne, NY, dedication of the “Brooklyn Cottage of Jewish Protectory.”

1913: In Peabody, MA, founding of Anshe Sfard synagogue.

1915: “A number of the most prominent business men of Paterson, NJ, who have interested themselves in the nation-wide campaign to secure clemency for Leo M. Frank of Atlanta, GA met today and passed resolutions to add their pleadings to those of the great multitude who are endeavoring to influence Governor Slaton.

1915: In Worcester, MA, Benjamin and Mary Meltzer gave birth to “Milton Meltzer, a historian and prolific author of nonfiction books for young people who helped start a movement away from the arid textbook style of the past.”  (As reported by Dennis Heveis)

1915: It was reported today that the Governor of Georgia has received “more than 75,000 letters and telegrams all parts of the United States urging that Leo Frank be saved from death” while “fewer than twenty letters” have been received suggesting “that the death sentence be executed.”

1918(7th of Sivan, 5678): Second Day of Shavuot; Yizkor

1918: Georg Nicolai writes to Albert Einstein telling him that he should not reproach himself for not taking an even more active role in protests against the war.

1917(26th of Iyar, 5677): Seven year old Stanley Bernstein, the son of Ike and Jean Bernstein passed away at Michael Reese Hospital in Chicago.

1921: Ra'anana, an agricultural settlement is founded in the Sharon region.

1921: The Nation included an essay by Lily Winner entitled "American Emigrés." http://jwa.org/thisweek/may/18/1921/lily-winner

1922: In Revere, MA, Mollie (née Friedopfer) and Michael Garber, a manufacturer gave birth to Wolf Martin Garber who gained fame as actor Bill Macy best known for his role of Walter Findlay in the sitcom “Maude.”

1924(14th of Iyar, 5684): Pesach Sheni

1924(14th of Iyar, 5684): Seventy-eight year old Esther Anna Phillips, a native of Liverpool passed away today after which she was buried in the Jewish cemetery at Natchitoches, LA “adjacent to Harold Phillips.”

1926: In Chicago, Professor James H. Breasted announced that Julius and William Rosenwald have donated $30,000 to be used in building a library near Luxor, Egypt that will be used by the veritable army of visiting scholars and scientist who come to the area each year.  The Rosenwald’s general philanthropy was evident in a variety of secular and Jewish charitable activities.

1927: Mayor Walker and more than 1,000 women welcomed Nathan Straus and Mrs. Straus on their return from a pilgrimage to Palestine at a tea given today at the Hotel Commodore by the Brooklyn Hadassah, the Women's Zionist Organization. During his address to the group, Mr. Straus officially presented Hadassah with the $250,000 health centre which is being built in Jerusalem.

1928: Today a project for a municipal milk supply in Warsaw was defeated in the City Council by the combined vote of the Polish Nationalist and the Jewish middle-class Alderman. The municipal plan was backed by Pilsudski Party and Jewish Socialists.

1930: Birthdate of Senator Warren B Rudman.  Born in Massachusetts, Rudman grew up in New Hampshire. A Korean War Era Veteran, Rudman practiced law in New Hampshire before being elected to the Senate as a Republican in 1980. He served until January 1993, having chosen not to run for re-election.  He is best known for the Graham-Rudman-Hollings Act, also referred to as the Balanced Budget and Deficit Control Act.

1930: Birthdate of Barbara Goldsmith, author of Little Gloria: Happy At Last.”

1930: “Sunny Skies,” a musical directed by Norman Taurog and starring Benny Rubin was released today in the United States.

1931: In New York City, Leon and Ida Bregman gave birth to Martin Bergman who went from entertainment agent to movie producer.

1933:  As part of the New Deal, Franklin Roosevelt signs the law creating the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA).  David Lilienthal, the son Jewish immigrants from Czechoslovakia, was the Director of TVA responsible for its early success and its ability to participate in the Manhattan Project during World War II.

1934: The Academy Award is called Oscar in print for the first time by Sidney Skolsky.  Skolsky was a close friend of Al Jolson and was responsible for the movie biography of the man who made the first “talkie

1934: It was reported today that "Leaping Lena" Levy has been Chicago sportswriter “that King Levinsky, the Windy City Walloper, otherwise known as the Chicago Assassin, the Personality Kid, and as plain Harry Krakow, is reported to be suffering from a nervous breakdown.” Levinsky was one of a veritable army of Jewish pugilists who fought during the 1920’s and 1930’s when the fight game was a Jewish game.

1936: It was announced in the House of Commons that a Royal Commission of Inquiry would be set up to investigate the cause of unrest in Palestine.  The Commission became known as the Peel Commission because its chairman was Lord Peel.

1936: “All Jewish national institutions in Palestine closed at noon today in mourning for Dr. Nahum Sokolow who died yesterday in London” and memorial services were held in the Jewish Agency Building with Menahem M. Ussishkin, president of the Jewish National Fund…and David Ben Gurion chairman of the Jewish Agency Executive as the principal speakers.”

1936: “Occupants of a speeding automobile fired shots into a Jewish barber shop in the Rehavia quarter of Jerusalem.”

1936: The British government responded to a request by the Jewish Public Works asking for police protection for its workers by advising “the department to give its employees their annual vacations.”

1936: In London, “the Colonial Secretary informed the House of Commons today that the Cabinet had made its decision” “to appoint a royal commission to investigate Arab and Jewish grievances on the spot” “without having consulted Arab or Jewish leaders.”

1936: According to reports published today, the United Palestine Appeal is seeking to raise $3, 500,000 in the United States “to finance Jewish colonization and land purchase in” Palestine after the Palestine Foundation Fund, the Jewish National Fund and the German Settlement Bureau of the Jewish Agency for Palestine had spent $2,061,720 “from October 1, 1935 to April 1, 1936 to aid the settlement in Plaestine of Jews from German, Poland and other lands.”

1937: Archbishop George Mundelein spoke out against the Nazi Party and Nazi Germany

1937: In Brooklyn, NY, Dewey and Adeline Weissfeld Albert gave birth to Jerome Lewis Albert “who with his father…created and operated Astroland, the space age-themed amusement park that breathed new life into the Coney Island Boardwalk in the 1960s, a time when it was losing its lure.” As reported by Dennis Hevesi)

1938: As Arab violence continued to escalate, The Palestine Post reported that Arab terrorists killed an Arab constable in Hebron. Arab farmers were robbed by Arab terrorists in villages around Jenin. The Public Works Department property was set on fire in Nablus and Jewish settlers near Hadera found their tractors and other machinery severely damaged.

1939: A gathering of members of the Hashomer Ha’tzair movement took place at Wieliczka, Poland.

1939: As Jews throughout Palestine protested against the White Paper with its limit of 75,000 Jews allowed to enter the country each year and the creation of a state that condemn the Jews to permanent minority status in violation of the Balfour Declaration and the Mandate, a resolution for Palestine Jewry was read aloud at the three hour long demonstration in Tel Aviv that stated in part: “Palestine Jewry declares the betrayal policy will never materialize…Palestine Jewry does not recognize the arbitrary restriction of immigration.  No power in the world can deter the natural right of our people to come home…  Palestine Jewry will not consent to leave the land of the country desolate, but undauntedly will continue reviving it.”

1941: Jewish veterans honor their dead

1942: The New York Times carried a report by a United Press International correspondent who had been trapped in Berlin at the outbreak of the war in December of 1941 and who reached Lisbon after being traded as part of a swap for Axis nationals in Allied hands.  According to the story 100,000 Jews had been slaughtered by the Nazis in the Baltic States, almost that many in Poland and twice as many in western Russia. 

1942: During a public protest of Nazi anti-Semitism staged in Berlin by Herbert Baum and his followers, portions of "The Soviet Paradise," a government-sponsored anti-Bolshevik exhibition, are set afire. Most members of Baum's group, as well as approximately 500 other Berlin Jews, are arrested.

1942: Another 1,420 Jews arrived in the Lodz ghetto from Brzeziny. Like the Jews who arrived the day before, their children were taken away from them. They were sent to Chelmno to be gassed.

1943: Nearly every resident of the Polish farming village of Szarajowka is shot or burned alive by the SS, Wehrmacht troops, and Gestapo agents. After the massacre, the village is razed. What was the crime for which the villagers were being punished? Sheltering Jews

1944 (25th of Iyar, 5704): Jewish partisan leader Aleksander Skotnicki is killed as his unit battles the armored SS Viking Division near the Parczew Forest in Poland.

1944: Deportations from Theresienstadt, Czechoslovakia, to Auschwitz end with the transport of 2500 Jews.

1944: In Hungary deportations of Jews to Auschwitz would begin today with a total of 437,000 being shipped to the death camp through July 7, 1944. 

1944: The Battle of Monte Cassino which Michał Waszyński filmed “as a member of the army film unit” attached to the 2nd Corps of the Polish Army came to an end today. 

1945(6th of Sivan, 5705): First observance of Shavuot after VE Day

1945: In Minneapolis, MN, Jewish mobster Davie Berman and Betty Ewald gave birth to journalist Susan Jane Berman who would be brutally murdered by Robert Durst.

1948: Moshe Dayan, who had been born in Degania, was given command of all forces in the area, including the settlements in the Kinarot Valley, after having been charged without creating a commando battalion in the 8th Brigade just a day before. A company of reinforcements from the Gadna program was allocated, along with 3 PIATs (a bazooka-like weapon). Other reinforcements came in the form of a company from the Yiftach Brigade and another company of paramilitaries from villages in the Lower Galilee and the Jezreel Valley. The Palmach counterattack on the police station on the night of May 18 gave the Israeli forces an additional day to prepare defense and attack plans

1948: Syrian aircraft bombed the Israeli village Kinneret and the regional school Beit Yerah, on the southwestern shore of the Sea of Galilee.

1948: After two days of fierce fighting a Syrian brigade including tanks overran Zemach, killing all forty-two of the Jewish defenders. 

1948: Poland, Czechoslovakia, Uruguay, and Nicaragua recognized Israel.

1948:  The Arab Legion captured the police fort on Mt. Scopus.  The illegal occupation of Mt. Scopus would end with the June War in 1967. 

1948: Between today and May 20, a unit of the Etzioni Brigade made repeated attempts to fight their way into the Old City at the Jaffa Gate.  Despite taking heavy casualties, the Jewish fighters failed in their effort. The brigade was fighting the Arab Legion, the name given to the Jordanian Army which was trained and led by British officers.

1948: Fighting under Egyptian command Saudi Arabia joined the other Arab armies in their invasion of Israel.

1948: "At midnight, Egyptian police" ransacked the home of Levan Zamir in Helwan.

1948: While at school today in Egypt, Levana Zamir's teacher told her that her uncle had been taken to prison allegedly because he was a Zionist.  The uncle was freed two years later and placed on a ship bound for France. 

1948: “According to Israeli historian Benny Morris” Kibbutz Bror Hayil was founded today. (The founders themselves claim the date should be May 5)

1948: “Another Part of the Forest” based on the play by Lillian Hellman directed by Michael Gordon was released in the United States today.

1949: “Miss Mary Antin Wrote Noted Book” published today described the career of the late Jewish author.

1950: As a result of Operation Ezra and Nehemiah, 120,000 Jews fleeing Iraq were brought to Israel over the course of a year's time.

1950: Israel has released the eight crewmen of an RAF flying-boat that had been forced down yesterday by Israeli fighter planes.  According to the pilot, the plan was flying from Bahrain to the Suez Canal when it wandered off course due to a navigational error.

1950: Colonel Harry D. Henshel and Charles L. Orenstein announced that the United States will be represented in the third World Maccabiah Games opening in Tel Aviv on September 27.  Henshel and Orenstein are co-chairman of the national committee for United States participation and Orenstein will chair the committee that will select the athletes.

1953: The Jerusalem Post reported that Abu Eliahu, 40, and Eliahu Ephraim, 45, two watchmen in the Jerusalem "corridor" were murdered by infiltrators.

1953: The Jerusalem Post reported that The Government approved the special unemployment relief tax scale and hoped to collect IL15m compulsory advance payment on account of future taxes.

1953: In Haifa, Oskar and Tikva Deutsch gave birth to  David Deutsch the British physicist whose doctoral advisor was Dennis Sciama and was awarded the Dirac Prize in 1998.

1958(28th of Iyar, 5718): Seventy-six year old Jacob “Yakov” Fichman who “received the Bialik Prize for his book of poetry Peat Sadeh ("A Corner of a Field")” passed away today.

1961: “The original London production of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s ‘The Sound of Music’” opened today.

1962: Two off-duty police detectives, Luke J. Fallon and John P. Finnegan, were killed today in a botched robbery of the Boro Park Tobacco Company.  Jerry Rosenberg, whose jailhouse nickname was Jerry the Jew and Anthony Portelli would be found guilty of the first double homicide of New York City police officers since 1927 and sentenced to death. Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller would later commute their sentences to life in prison.  At the time of his death in 2009, Rosenberg would be the longest serving convict in the New York State prison system.

1965 (16th of Iyar, 5725): Israeli spy Eli Cohen was publicly executed by the Syrians. This execution was aired on national Syrian television. After his execution, a sign with Anti-Zionist messages was placed on his hanging body. His body was left to hang for six hours. Eli was born in Alexandria, Egypt on December 26, 1928. The son of two Syrian Jews, Eli was raised in a strong Jewish and Zionist educational environment. True to their Zionist ideals, the Cohen family moved to Israel in 1949. However, Eli stayed behind to organize Zionist and Jewish activities in Egypt. Eventually, Eli moved to Israel and began training with the Israeli intelligence organization. His preparation was extensive and exhaustive. From weapons to Arab customs to espionage technology, he was trained to know everything about the craft of being a spy. In 1961, the Chief of Military Intelligence, Chaim Herzog, authorized Eli Cohen to be used as a spy for the State of Israel. Soon after, he was escorted to the airport with a ticket for Argentina where he would begin to establish his portfolio under his new assumed identity, Kamal Amin Ta'abet. While in Argentina, he established his cover as a Syrian émigré and began to make inroads within the Syrian community of Buenos Aries. In time, he established himself as a successful businessman and began to establish relationships among the Syrian diplomatic corps in Argentina. It was during this time that Eli met Col. Amin al-Hafez. Through his extravagant hosting of his diplomatic contacts, he was eventually invited to visit Syria to set up business operations. Late in 1961, Eli returned to Israel for a short visit with his wife. It was during this visit that he finalized requirements for his mission in Syria. There was no question that Eli was already making impressive progress within the Syrian political and social circuits. Staring in 1961, the Syrian Ba'ath Party was beginning its rise to power within the Syrian government. It was important to Eli that he travel to Syria as the party began to gain power and influence. Eli arrived in Damascus in 1962, acting as an Argentinean entrepreneur returning home to Syria. It was during this time in Syria that Eli was very careful to develop his relationships with members of the Ba'ath party. True to his style in Argentina, Eli hosted parties and hob-nobbed in the highest social and political circles. As Eli gained the trust of these high officials, they openly discussed matters of military and political importance with him. Between 1962 and 1965, Eli made three secret trips home to be with his wife and children. When the Ba'ath party seized power in 1963, Eli Cohen was well established and entrenched within the social elites of Syria. He became a “trusted friend” of the highest-ranking members of the Ba'ath party, all the while transmitting vital information home to Israel via a transmitter that was hidden in his home. His ability to pierce the highest ranks of the government continued the longer he stayed in Syria. He was invited to discussions regarding Syria's intentions to divert water from the headwaters of the Jordan River. In 1963, Eli transmitted the details regarding the diversion of the waters back to the Israelis. As a result, the IDF Air Force was able to effectively destroy Syrian plans for this project. Cohen exhibited another example of his daring espionage when he visited the Syrian-held Golan Heights, bordering Israel. The Golan was a “strategic asset” for Syria, which allowed them the ability to facilitate acts of aggression against the northern Israeli towns. The Golan was considered a top secret area open only to the top members of the Syrian military. Cohen, skilled in his craft, was able to not only get a tour of the area, but able to get a comprehensive military briefing of the Golan and all its positions. It was during this trip that the “famous” eucalyptus trees were planted. As Eli was being briefed as to the Syrian fortifications of the Golan, he suggested that they plant eucalyptus trees to give the Israelis the impression that the locations were not fortified, and also to offer shade for the Syrian soldiers. As the story goes, his ideas were implemented, and as a result, the Israelis knew where every single fortification was located as a result of the eucalyptus trees. His old contact from Argentina, Col. Amin al-Hafez had risen in the Ba'ath party and eventually became Prime Minster of Syria. After Col. Hafez came to power, he even considered appointing Cohen the Deputy Minister of Defense for Syria. In November, 1964, Eli made another visit back to Israel. During this trip he expressed his desire to end this assignment since changes were taking place in Syria that were not favorable to his cover. After much debate, Eli agreed to return for one more tour of Syria. The intelligence that Eli had provided was too valuable. During his final stay in Syria, Eli was less careful of his espionage transmissions. Alarmed that information was leaking out of the country, the Syrians, with the help of their Soviet advisors, conducted a comprehensive probe to find the intelligence leak. During January 1961, transmissions were pinpointed to Eli's home. Syrian intelligence caught Eli in the act, transmitting information back to Israel. He was apprehended and tortured, but didn't release any information of real value to the Syrians. Syria staged a public show and Eli Cohen was found guilty of espionage. Attempts were made to save Eli Cohen. World leaders and prominent businessmen, along with the Israeli government and the Pope attempted to arbitrate a solution for Eli, but with no success. Clearly, Eli's espionage contributions toward the security of the State of Israel were unmatched most. He was so skilled at his craft that he was easily able to assimilate into the day-to-day life within Damascus. He was able to achieve the unthinkable and befriended the highest echelons of the Syrian government and military. Not only was he able to gain access where others could not, he was in the position to provide input that allowed him to influence government and military decisions. There is no question that the intelligence that he compiled was highly instrumental in allowing Israel to quickly and effectively defeat the Syrians and gain the Golan Heights during the Six Day War. For his heroism and skill, Eli Cohen is known as Israel's greatest spy. But in all actuality, he might be a contender for the greatest secret agent of the 20th century

1969: In Detroit, Michigan, Rhoda Yura and Dan Glickman, the former Kansas Congressman, Secretary of Agriculture, and president of the MPAA gave birth to producer and MGM President Jonathan Glickman

1972(4th of Iyar, 5732): Yom HaZikaron

1973: Having been denied the right to read from the Torah on a Saturday morning, 13 year old Elena Kagan read from the Book of Ruth tonight, on Friday night.

1973(16th of Iyar, 5733): Israeli poet and Editor Avraham Shlonsky passed away. A native of Russia, he was a driving force in the creation of Modern Hebrew literature. Among other accomplishments he won both the Bialk and Israel prizes. 

http://poemsintranslation.blogspot.com/2011/02/abraham-shlonsky-toil-from-hebrew.html\

1976: “Missouri Breaks” a western movie produced by Elliot Kastner and featuring Steve Franken as “Lonesome Kid” was released today in the United States.

1977: Menachem Begin became Israel's Prime Minister.  Begin's election marked a major shift in Israeli politics.  Begin was a disciple of Jabotinsky, leader of the Irgun, and the polar opposite of the Labor Zionists who had dominated Israeli politics even before the state had been created.  Begin proved to be more of a pragmatist than had been expected.  He met with Sadat and signed the Camp David Accords which led to the swapping of the Sinai for a peace treaty with Egypt.  Despite international furor, Begin bombed an Iraqi reactor, an action that people came to appreciate after the first Gulf War.  Begin resigned after the death of his wife and went into a state of semi-seclusion. He passed away in 1992.

1977(1st of Sivan, 5737): Rosh Chodesh Sivan

1977: Samuel Lewis, the new U.S. Ambassador to Israel, arrived today to take up his ambassadorial post.

1978: The Jerusalem Post reported the UNIFIL's admission that it had allowed the terrorists to move, together with their arms, into South Lebanon.

1978: The Jerusalem Post reported that the Israeli Government and the Jewish Agency were considering steps how to stop HIAS (the Hebrew Immigrants Aid Society), from helping Russian Jewish emigrants to go to destinations other than Israel. Only 72 out of the 1,086 Jews who left Russia in April, 1978, made their way to Israel.

1978: The Jerusalem Post reported that the Mifal Hapayis designated IL7m. for education and health in the West Bank and Gaza.

1980: In Israel, a stone marker was unveiled in a memorial forest of 3,500 trees which had been created to honor Major Noel S. Jacobs who had commanded the Jewish Company of the Shanghai Volunteer Corps.

1983(6th of Sivan, 5743): Shavuot

1986: Attorney General Yitzhak Zamir “demanded to prosecute Avraham Shalom, head of the GSS” (General Security Service) as part of his investigation into allegations that two terrorists had been murdered by the GSS.

1986: Richard Edelman, President and CEO of Edelman married Rosalind Ann Walrath at the Harvard Club of New York.

1988: Braving a steady rain, 750 supporters of Shimon Peres attended a rally for the Israeli foreign minister at the Stephen Wise Free Synagogue in Manhattan today.

1990: “Bird On A Wire” a comedy produced by Rob Cohn, with a script by David Seltzer, co-starring Gold Hawn and with music by Hans Zimmer was released today in the United States.

1991: The Associated Press reported that the B. Manischewitz Company was given a $1 million fine by United States District Judge Harold Ackerman for conspiring to fix the price of Passover matzoth. Manischewitz had pleaded no contest to a criminal indictment last month, saying it could not defend charges it conspired to fix prices from 1981 to at least April 1986. The indictment said Manischewitz, based in Jersey City, had conspired to raise the price of $25 million worth of Passover matzoth in cooperation with Horowitz Brothers & Margareten and with Aron Streit Inc., both of New York. Horowitz has since been taken over by Manischewitz. The Government has not said why Horowitz and Aron Striet were not indicted. The merchant banking firm of Kohlberg & Company acquired Manischewitz in January and had nothing to do with the scheme.

1993:  “Cup Final” an Israeli movie directed by Eran Riklis was released in the United Kingdom today

1994: Israel withdrew from the Gaza Strip in what was supposed to have been one step along the road to peace with the Palestinians.

1995: Simone Veil “born Simone Annie Liline Jacob, the daughter of a Jewish architect” completed her second term as French Minister of Health.

 1996(29th of Iyar, 5756): English businessman and racehorse owner Simon Weinstock passes away at the age of 44

1997: The New York Times featured reviews of books by Jewish authors and/or of special interest to Jewish readers including Jacob Two-Two’s First Spy Case by Mordecai Richler.

2001(25th of Iyar, 5761): Tirza Polonsky, 66, of Moshav Kfar Haim; Miriam Waxman, 51, of Hadera; David Yarkoni, 53, of Netanya; Yulia Tratiakova, 21, of Netanya; and Vladislav Sorokin, 34, of Netanya were killed in a suicide bombing at Hasharon Mall in the seaside city of Netanya, in which over 100 were wounded. Hamas claimed responsibility for the attack (Jewish Virtual Library)

2001(25th of Iyar, 5761): Lt. Yair Nebenzahl, 22, of Neve Tzuf (Halamish), was killed and his mother seriously wounded, in a Palestinian roadside ambush north of Jerusalem.

2002(7th of Sivan, 5762): Second Day of Shavuot

2002(7th of Sivan, 5762): Zypora Spaisman, Polish born American actress and longtime supporter of the Yiddish theatre, passed away at the age of 86.

2003: The New York Times featured books by Jewish writers and/or of special interest to Jewish readers including “Heart, You Bully, You Bully, You Punk” by Leah Hager Cohen.

2003(16th of Iyar, 5763): “Seven people were killed and 20 wounded in a suicide bombing on Egged bus #6 near French Hill in Jerusalem. Hamas claimed responsibility for the attack. Half an hour later, a second suicide bomber was killed when he was intercepted by police at a road block in northern Jerusalem. The victims: Olga Brenner, 52, of Jerusalem; Yitzhak Moyal, 64, of Jerusalem; Nelly Perov, 55, of Jerusalem; Ghalab Tawil, 42, of Shuafat; Marina Tsahivershvili, 44, of Jerusalem; Shimon Ustinsky, 68, of Jerusalem; and Roni Yisraeli, 34, of Jerusalem.”

2003: Steve Averbach “was on a bus heading to work when a Palestinian terrorist dressed as a fervently Orthodox Jew got on board. Averbach realized immediately that he was a suicide bomber. As he reached for his handgun, the terrorist blew himself up, killing seven people and seriously injuring 20, including Averbach. Israel’s internal security ministry later wrote Averbach a letter saying, “An investigation of the incident revealed that you were courageous, brave, and selfless in attempting to prevent a mortal attack.” It said the bomber had planned to blow himself up in the crowded center of town or in the bus station, where the death toll would have been far higher.”

2004: American Jewish Heritage Torah Day as proclaimed by Albany, NY Mayor Kathy Sheehan

2004: The IDF launched Operation Rainbow in response to the deaths of 13 soldiers, the majority of whom were killed after their armored personnel carriers were blown up in the southern Gazan town of Rafah. The goal of the eight-day operation was to uncover weapons-smuggling tunnels along the Philadelphi Corridor, and to prevent the smuggling of Strella shoulder-to-air anti-aircraft missiles from the Sinai into Gaza.

2005: In Belgium, premiere of “Or” (My Treasure) an Israeli-French production that had won five awards at the Cannes Film Festival.

2006: Ex-Movie Exec Isn’t Silent About Films published today provides Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Oscar Winner Roger Mayer’s view of the industry to which he devoted 53 years of his life.

2006: A Sarajevo publisher announced that The Sarajevo Haggadah, a centuries-old Jewish holy book that survived the Spanish inquisition, the Nazi Holocaust and Bosnia's 1992-1995 war has been reprinted in limited editions. The Sarajevo Haggadah was made into 613 copies on hand-made paper that recreates the appearance of the 14th century original by 95 percent, the head of the Rabic publishing house, Goran Mikulic, told Agence France Presse. The number of copies was chosen to symbolize the number of commandments, or mitzvoth, that Jews are obliged to observe. "The edition was printed in Italy and almost everything was done by hand," Mikulic said. The original handwritten manuscript on bleached calfskin illuminated in copper and gold is the world's oldest Sephardic Haggadah, containing the text recited by Jews on the Passover holiday.

2006: “The White House announced that Donald Kohn had been nominated by President George W. Bush to serve a four year term as the vice chairman of the Federal Reserve System.

2006: Rabbi Ada Zavidov is declared the new chairwoman of the Reform Movement's Rabbinic Council at the opening of the Israel Movement for Progressive Judaism's 18th Biennial Convention.  About 1,000 rabbis and movement members, including Rabbi Elliott Kleinman, vice president of the Union for Reform Judaism in America attend the conference, which focuses on the Jewish family. Zavidov, granddaughter of Aba Achimeir - one of the founding fathers of the Revisionist Party in pre-state Israel - is the first female Israeli native to chair the rabbinic council.

2007: Rosh Chodesh Sivan, 5767

2007: The fifth season of Kokhav Nolad, the popular Israeli television show, began today.

2007: The five candidates for the leadership of the Labor Party face off in a Labor central committee meeting in Tel Aviv that will decide whether Labor should leave Prime Minister Ehud Olmert's government.

2007: The University of Teramo closed one of its campuses to prevent a planned lecture by Robert Faurisson, a retired French professor who denies gas chambers were used in Nazi concentration camps.

2008: Phoenix Mayor Phil Gordon declared today, "Jewish News of Greater Phoenix Day" in honor of the newspaper's "exemplary service to the community and the Jewish people".

2008: Veteran journalist Jane Eisner was appointed to be the first female editor of the Forward.

2008: The Jewish Historical Society of Greater Washington marks the 60th anniversary of the state of Israel with a series of book talks by Laura Cohen Apelbaum on Jewish Washington: Scrapbook of an American Community (the companion to the award-winning exhibit of the same name) the third of which is held at Barnes & Noble in Rockville, Md.

2008: The New York Times book section featured a review of Common Wealth: Economics for a Crowded Planet by Jeffrey D. Sachs.

2008: The Washington Post book section featured a review of Ellen Feldman’s novel entitled Scottsboro which “painstakingly recreates the infamous Scottsboro case, complete with all the twists and turns and society-exposing foibles.”  Two Jewish lawyers, Samuel Leibowitz and Joseph Brodsky, saved the lives of the defendants in this infamous case.

2008: In Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Temple Judah hosts it’s Temple Wide Picnic marking the close of the Religious School year; farewell until Fall.

2008: The appointment of Jane R. Eisner, former editorial page editor of the Philadelphia Inquirer as editor of The Forward is officially approved at today’s meeting of The Forward Association

2008:  The Quad City Jewish Federation hosts Israeli Yom Ha’Azma’ut Rally in Bettendorf, Iowa featuring Sasha Grishkov, finalist from the Israeli television series A Star is Born (Israeli version of American Idol) who will perform with her Israeli band.

2008: “Pamela's First Musical,” written with Cy Coleman and David Zippel, based on Wendy Wasserstein's children's book, received its world premiere in a concert staging at Town Hall in New York City today.

2009; New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman address the Class of 2009 at Grinnell

College’s commencement exercises where he receives an honorary degree along with

Jodie Levin-Epstein, deputy director of the Center for Law and Social Policy in Washington, D.C.

2009: The Arizona Chapter of the American Jewish Committee presented the Greater Phoenix Jewish News with the RosaLee Shluker Community Service Award in honor of its 60th anniversary.

2009: Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu meets with President Barak Obama in Washington, D.C.

2009: In an article about The Tribeca/ESPN Sports film festival, Sports Illustrated singles out “A Matter of Size,” an Israeli film about Herzl Musiker, a middle aged fat Israel waiter, who discovers his salvation in the world of Sumo Wrestling.

2009: In a Lecture on Nazi Propaganda at the Library of Congress, Dr. Gabriel Weimann, a Professor of Communication at Haifa University, Israel and at the American University, Washington, D.C., examines the social and psychological mechanisms activated by the sophisticated and powerful Nazi propaganda. The multi-media presentation includes posters, movies, speeches, public events, books, cartoons and other media used by the Nazis.

2009: In the best tradition of genteel British anti-Semitism, movie director Ken Loach called for people to boycott the Edinburgh Film Festival if festival’s sponsors accept a 300 pound grant from the Israeli embassy that will enable “Tel Aviv University graduate Tali Shalom Ezer to travel to Scotland for a screening of her film, ‘Surrogate.’”

2009: Michael Sandel gave the 2009 Reith Lectures on "A New Citizenship" in London

2009, American money manager and Bernard Madoff association Jacob Ezra Merkin's control of Ascot, Gabriel and Ariel hedge funds are to be placed into receivership for liquidation by Guidepost Partners

2010(5th of Sivan, 5770): Erev Shavuot

2010: Founding editor of DoubleX Hanna Rosin and Slate editor David Plotz are scheduled to let loose on the Bible while Alyssa Shelasky of Apron Anxiety is scheduled to whip up a dairy dish and Shavuotini for all to taste as part of “The Ten: An Alternative Shavuot Experience” in Washington, D.C.

2011: Convicted white-collar crook, Andrew Fastow was released to a Houston halfway house for the remainder of his sentence.

2011: The YIVO Institute is scheduled to present a special evening with acclaimed novelist Philip Roth during which Roth will read excerpts from his new novel, “Nemesis” which tells the story of a terrifying polio epidemic raging in Newark, New Jersey in the summer of 1944 and its devastating effect on the closely knit, family-oriented community and its children.

2011: Charlotte Dubin, award-winning writer and editor for many publications, including Michigan Jewish History and the Detroit Jewish News is scheduled to receive the Leonard N. Simons History Award at  the

Jewish Historical Society of Michigan’s Annual Meeting

2011: Shelomo Alfassá, a writer, author, editor, curator and historian, whose focus has been on Iberian and Ottoman Jewish history, culture and Jewish law, is scheduled to deliver an illustrated lecture that “will give an overview of the history of Sephardic Jews – from Spain and Portugal to New York City” sponsored by the Derfner Judaica Museum at The Hebrew Home at Riverdale, New York City.

2011: David McKenzie is scheduled to deliver a lecture entitled “Jewish Life in Mr. Lincoln's City” sponsored by the Jewish Historical Society of Greater Washington

2011: The "Arbeit Macht Frei” sign stolen from Auschwitz and cut into three pieces has been repaired.

The iron sign was unveiled today in the laboratory of the camp museum. Repairs to the sign, which measures 16 feet across and means "Work makes you free," took several months. It was stolen from the former Nazi concentration camp on Dec. 18, 2009 and recovered elsewhere in the country 72 hours later. It was found cut into three pieces.A copy of the sign has been placed above the entrance gate. The repaired sign will likely become part of a new exhibition, the BBC reported. Five Polish men were convicted of carrying out the theft on behalf of a Swedish citizen, Anders Hogstrom, who acted as a middleman for a neo-Nazi buyer. Hogstrom founded the far-right National Socialist Front party in Sweden in 1994.

2011: Philip Roth, the much-lauded author of "Portnoy's Complaint", won the biennial Man Booker International Prize today, adding to a collection of prizes that includes two National Book Awards.

Roth, whose work includes his noted 1959 debut "Goodbye, Columbus", has also won the Pulitzer Prize for "American Pastoral"

2012: Facebook, the creation of Mark Zuckerberg is scheduled to have it initial public offering (IPO)

2012: Jewish Primary Day School of the Nation’s Capital, Partnership for Jewish Life and Learning, Temple Micah, Temple Sinai Nursery School and Washington Hebrew Congregation are scheduled to sponsor ShirLaLa Family Shabbat Service and Dinner featuring Shira Klein.

2013: The 721 general assembly commissioners representing the Church of Scotland are scheduled to vote on “The Inheritance of Abraham,” a report which says scripture” provides no basis for Jewish claims to Israel” (As reported by JTA)

2013: The IPO String Trio is scheduled to perform two musicales in the San Francisco Bay area.

2013: In Israel the Indigo Festival on the Sea of Galilee and the Abu Gosh Festival are scheduled to come to an end.

2013: “Bezalel on Tour” will be on view for the first time at G91 Loft in New York City.

2013: Cantor Joel Caplan of Agudath Israel in Caldwell, NJ, will lead Shabbat morning service at Agudas Achim, as the Iowa City congregation dedicates its new facility in suburban Coralville.  Cantor Caplan is the son of Dick and Ellen Caplan, pillars of the Iowa City Jewish community. Cantor Caplan began his Jewish odyssey at Augdas Achim under the guidance of Rabbi Jeff Portman and began his musical odyssey at West High in Iowa City.

2013: The advanced S-300 Russian air defense system, which Moscow has pledged to deliver to Syria, could be transferred to Hezbollah and beyond, a senior defense official warned today. Amos Gilad, head of the security-diplomatic branch of the Defense Ministry, told Channel 2, "These weapons are dangerous. If Hezbollah and Iran support Syria, why shouldn't they [the Syrians] transfer these weapons to Hezbollah? It's a threat to us, a threat to the Americans, and a threat to the Persian Gulf."

2013: There is no chance that Israel could reach a peace agreement with Hamas, Justice Minister Tzipi Livni said this evening in an interview with Army Radio.

2014: The New York Times features reviews of books by Jewish authors and/or of special interest to Jewish readers including American Innovations by Rivka Galchen and To Rise at a Decent Hour by University of Iowa graduate Joshua Ferris

2014(18th of Iyar, 5774): Lag B’Omer

2014: “The Sturgeon Queens” is scheduled to be shown at the Rockland County JCC.

2014: In Rockville, MD, as part of the B’nai Israel Distinguished Scholar Series, Mark Smith and Elizabeth Bloch-Smith are scheduled to speak on “Roots of Israelite Monotheism: Evidence from Archaeology & Texts.”

2014: “Jewish reggae star Matisyahu” is scheduled to perform with cantor Jessica Hutchings at Temple Menorah in Redondo Beach, CA.(As reported by Renee Ghert-Zand)

2014: “The “Holocaust Cellar” is scheduled to open today, as part of the Holocaust museum located in Wiesel’s pre-World War II home, which sits in the old Jewish Ghetto of Sighet in Maramures County.

2014: The Jewish Federation of Greater Washington is scheduled to host “Israel@66” celebrating Israel’s 66th birthday

2014: “Maccabi Electra Tel Aviv won the Euroleague basketball final 96-86 tonight against Real Madrid in Milan in an overtime victory.”

2014: “Israel’s tourism ministry said today it expects the papal visit later this month to give a sharp boost to tourism by Christians, who already account for a majority of tourism to the Holy Land.”

2014: New Jersey Governor and Republican presidential hopeful “gives the keynote address today at the Champions of Jewish Values International awards gala in New York.”

2015: The Center for Jewish History is scheduled to host a screening of Wing and a Prayer followed by a panel discussion of the documentary that describes the role of a handful of mostly foreign pilots in the creation of the State of Israel.

2015: Alicia Jo Rabins is scheduled to “examine the Book of Ruth through midrash and art” as part of JWA’s first-ever on-line lunch and learn.

2015: In partnership with the Jewish Genealogy Society of Greater Washington and the Library's Hebraic Section of the African and Middle Eastern Division Historian and storyteller Tammy Hepps is scheduled to present "In Search of a Usable Past: Reconstructing the Jewish History of Homestead, Pennsylvania."

2015(29th of Iyar, 5775): Eighty-year of “quiz kid” Ruth Duskin Feldman passed away today. (As reported by Margalit Fox)

2015(29th of Iyar, 5775): Recitation of Tefillat HaShlah - the Shelah's Prayer since Rabbi Isaac Horowitz wrote that the eve of the first day of the Hebrew month of Sivan is the most auspicious time to pray for the physical and spiritual welfare of one's children and grandchildren, since Sivan was the month that the Torah was given to the Jewish people.

2016: The Shekel, The Journal of Israel and Jewish History and Numismatics, published since 1968, is scheduled to publish its first special issue--dedicated to Jewish American Heritage Month today.

2016: In Baltimore, MD, the JCCs of North America Biennial Convention is scheduled to come to an end.

2016: In Philadelphia, Rabbi Lance J. Sussman is scheduled to present “Suburban Frontiers: Jewish Life in Philadelphia Since 1960.”

2016: In Cedar Rapids, IA, the Hadassah Book Club is scheduled to discuss Helga’s Diary by Helga Weiss.

2016: The Jewish Book Council is scheduled to presentRabbi David Wolpe in conversation with the 2016 Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature Authors; Winner Lisa Moses Leff, Choice Award Recipient Yehudah Mirsky and Fellows Dan Ephron, Aviya Kushner, and Adam D. Mendelsohn.

 

 

No comments: